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dc.contributor.authorSheldon, Amber
dc.contributor.authorHill, Lawrence
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-23T10:52:48Z
dc.date.available2020-01-23T10:52:48Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-10
dc.identifier.citationSheldon, A. and Hill, L. 2019. Scoping ambulance emissions: recommendations for reducing engine idling time. Journal of Paramedic Practice, 11 (7), 305–312.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1759-1376
dc.identifier.issn2041-9457
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/jpar.2019.11.7.305
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/655
dc.description.abstractThe NHS is a significant contributor to the UK's greenhouse gases and environmental pollution. The current review seeks to examine the degree to which ambulance services contribute to environmental pollution and provides quality improvement suggestions that may reduce emissions, save money and improve public health. A literature search was conducted to identify the English language literature for the past 7 years related to ambulance service carbon emissions and pertinent strategies for reducing harm. An average of 31.3 kg of carbon dioxide (CO2) is produced per ambulance response in the current box-shaped ambulance design. A number of quality improvement suggestions related to cost, emissions and public health emerge. Ambulance services should consider a range of system-level and individual-focused interventions in order to reduce emissions, save money and promote public health. Abstract published with permission.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectAmbulancesen_US
dc.subjectCarbon Footprinten_US
dc.subjectTraffic-Related Pollutionen_US
dc.subjectAmbulance Servicesen_US
dc.titleScoping ambulance emissions: recommendations for reducing engine idling timeen_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Paramedic Practiceen_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-12-05
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2019-07-10
html.description.abstractThe NHS is a significant contributor to the UK's greenhouse gases and environmental pollution. The current review seeks to examine the degree to which ambulance services contribute to environmental pollution and provides quality improvement suggestions that may reduce emissions, save money and improve public health. A literature search was conducted to identify the English language literature for the past 7 years related to ambulance service carbon emissions and pertinent strategies for reducing harm. An average of 31.3 kg of carbon dioxide (CO2) is produced per ambulance response in the current box-shaped ambulance design. A number of quality improvement suggestions related to cost, emissions and public health emerge. Ambulance services should consider a range of system-level and individual-focused interventions in order to reduce emissions, save money and promote public health. Abstract published with permission.en_US


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