Welcome to amber - the home of ambulance service research

Congratulations to Chris Smith from Canada who was awarded the amber prize for his presentation Leveraging paramedic data to investigate the effect of COVID-19 on community Opioid Overdoses [  http://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.35356.41603 ] at this years 999EMS Research Forum 2021. 

amber contains records of published research authored by NHS staff working in Ambulance Services in England. amber is managed by the Library and Knowledge Services for NHS Ambulance Services in England [LKS ASE]. For more information see the About pages or contact Matt Holland, LKS ASE Librarian. Additional material is available on the LKS ASE website.

We are committed to delivering and maintaining a high quality of data.  If you are aware of any inaccuracies in the data on amber do contact us and we will correct it.  amber is a work in progress. Currently it contains records from 2011 - 2019. We will update this page as more records are added.

  • Comparison of manikin-based simulators and patient monitor simulators within paramedic education: the student perspective

    Mortimer, Craig (2017-12-14)
    Objective Investigate the impact to paramedic students of patient monitor simulators, when compared with manikin-based simulators within an educational programme. Design An exploratory study using an online questionnaire to gain qualitative and quantitative data. Setting One London university delivering a paramedic science programme. Participants A total of 136 paramedic students sponsored by a UK ambulance service were approached for this study. Data were received from 43 respondents (32%). Main outcome measures Comparison of simulators and their effect on student development through the identification of the student’s own perceived ability following use, perception of other’s ability (fellow students studying same course) following use and perception of the two pieces of simulation equipment available. Results The majority of respondents identified that simulation both increased their confidence and ability to demonstrate new knowledge and skills during simulation (97%) and further increased their ability to manage real patients (95%). Respondents agreed that there were advantages and disadvantages of using simulation, but these were not in line with those identified in previous studies. Instead of the human factors and non-technical skills outlined, students were much more practically focused on how the equipment performed. Conclusions This study suggests that there is a clear link between simulation and increased student confidence, but any issues encountered with the simulator equipment can reduce this benefit, causing the student’s learning environment to falter. Transitioning to monitor-based simulators is seen as a positive move, although the integration of manikins with this equipment is identified as being necessary. https://stel.bmj.com/content/4/2/65. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjstel-2017-000252
  • What is the most appropriate out-of-hospital opioid for adults with traumatic pain?

    Ellis, Pierre (2017-12-06)
    Methods: The literature search was carried out using multiple databases to identify relevant out-of-hospital research with additional grey literature to support. The main themes encountered were intravenous morphine compared to intravenous fentanyl, and the contrast between them. Discussion: There were no significant differences in effectiveness or adverse effects. Intranasal application was thought to be favoured where intravenous access was unobtainable. Conclusions: Further research is required to establish which is the most appropriate opioid. This could include a greater focus on the onset time, duration and optimal dose. Increased education and organisational focus would need to be addressed alongside a change in drug formulary for the out-of-hospital clinician. Abstract published with permission.
  • Using deterministic record linkage to link ambulance and emergency department data: is it possible without patient identifiers?

    Clark, Sophie Jane; Halter, Mary; Porter, Alison; Smith, Holly Christina; Brand, Martin; Fothergill, Rachael; Lindridge, Jaqualine; McTigue, Martin; Snooks, Helen (2019-08)
  • Clinical leadership in the ambulance service

    Walker, Alison; Sibson, Lynda; Marshall, Andrea (2010-06-18)
    Ambulance Services in England have recently launched the Report of the National Steering Group on Clinical Leadership in the Ambulance Service. This is the first document specifically reviewing the roles and development of Clinical Leadership, at all levels, for UK ambulance service clinicians. The document covers an evidence-based review of clinical leadership principles outlined in key policy documents, publications and systems; a strategic framework for clinical leadership in ambulance service; and includes examples of good current practice in ambulance service clinical leadership and development Clinical leadership has been referred to in a number of key policy documents; most notably, Taking Healthcare to the Patient: Transforming NHS Ambulance Services (DH 2005) made a number of recommendations of which Recommendation 62 is the most relevant to this document. “There should be improved opportunity for career progression, with scope for ambulance professionals to become clinical leaders. While ambulance trusts will always need clinical direction from a variety of specialties, they should develop the potential of their own staff to influence clinical developments and improve and assure quality of care.” This report focuses on putting theory into practice, a proposed clinical leadership ladder and a clinical leadership self-assessment tool for individuals and organisations. Some clinical leadership examples are also included. The completed report was formally launched at the Ambulance Leadership Forum (English ambulance services, with participation for Clinical Leadership from the other UK ambulance services) in April 2009 and will pave the way for the development of the Ambulance Service National Future Clinical Leaders Group. This national pilot, involving all the UK NHS ambulance services, will comprise of staff with paramedic backgrounds who will receive leadership development to work with the CEOs and Directors of Clinical Care groups to progress clinical quality and clinical leadership development in the ambulance service. https://emj.bmj.com/content/27/6/490.2. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2009.078915
  • Mentorship for paramedic practice: bridging the gap

    Sibson, Lynda; Mursell, Ian (2010-06)
    In the second of a series of four articles on mentorship for paramedic practice, this article focuses on the aspect of the assessment of competence and how these relate to everyday clinical practice in term of mentorship. The article will also address the concept of competence and performance and how these two concepts can be applied to bridging the theory-practice gap that can often be the cause of poor learning and subsequent inadequate clinical practice. Abstract published with permission.

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