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dc.contributor.authorBrown, Nick
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-16T14:57:12Z
dc.date.available2019-10-16T14:57:12Z
dc.date.issued2016-02
dc.identifier.citationBrown, N., 2016. Pre-hospital resuscitation: what shall we tell the family? Journal of Paramedic Practice, 8 (2), 86-89.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1759-1376
dc.identifier.issn2041-9457
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/jpar.2016.8.2.86
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/390
dc.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. Cardiac arrest is a rarely attended event as a proportion of overall paramedic workload. When paramedics do attend such an event the management focus is largely concerned with clinical intervention and there may not be the capacity or appreciation for offering ongoing support to family members present. Indeed, even training may not have covered this element of care. Regardless of the prognosis for the patient, evidence suggests that there is benefit in directly involving relatives during the resuscitation. Engaging them with carefully considered and informed dialogue certainly seems humane at least. In which case, a structured and holistic approach should be employed where clinical care and emotional support go hand in hand.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectPre-hospitalen_US
dc.subjectResuscitationen_US
dc.subjectVisitationen_US
dc.subjectPatient Care Managementen_US
dc.titlePre-hospital resuscitation: what shall we tell the family?en_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Paramedic Practiceen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-08-07
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-08-07
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2016-02
html.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. Cardiac arrest is a rarely attended event as a proportion of overall paramedic workload. When paramedics do attend such an event the management focus is largely concerned with clinical intervention and there may not be the capacity or appreciation for offering ongoing support to family members present. Indeed, even training may not have covered this element of care. Regardless of the prognosis for the patient, evidence suggests that there is benefit in directly involving relatives during the resuscitation. Engaging them with carefully considered and informed dialogue certainly seems humane at least. In which case, a structured and holistic approach should be employed where clinical care and emotional support go hand in hand.en_US


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