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dc.contributor.authorEaton-Williams, Peter
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Julia
dc.date.accessioned2023-08-17T19:09:37Z
dc.date.available2023-08-17T19:09:37Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-01
dc.identifier.citationEaton Williams, P., and Williams, J., 2022. 'Family members screaming for help makes it very difficult to don PPE.' a qualitative report on ambulance staff experiences of personal protective equipment (PPE) use and infection prevention and control (IPC) practices during the Covid-19 pandemic. BMJ Open, 12 (S1), A1.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2022-EMS.2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/1553
dc.description.abstractBackground The COVID-19 Ambulance Response Assessment (CARA) study was a prospective, longitudinal survey of UK ambulance staff during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. CARA aimed to evaluate perceptions of preparedness and wellbeing, and to collect staff suggestions to benefit working practices and conditions. Method Three online questionnaires were presented, coinciding with the acceleration, peak and deceleration phases of the first COVID-19 wave in 2020. Inductive thematic analysis was employed to represent 14,237 free text responses from 3,717 participants to 18 free-text questions overall. This report focuses on experiences of IPC practices. Results Many participants lacked confidence in using PPE because of low familiarity, an inadequate evidence-base and changing policy. Some experienced insufficient supply, items of poor quality and suboptimal fit-testing procedure. PPE use was further influenced by discomfort, urgency, and perceptions of risk. Various suggestions were made to improve IPC practices, including decontamination personnel, staff 'bubbles' and limiting exposure through public education and remote triage improvements. Conclusion Repeated poor experiences of implementing IPC practices1 2 demand that lessons are learnt from this pandemic. PPE developed with specific regard for ambulance staff 's unique working environment and for them to receive regular familiarization training in its use would likely benefit performance and confidence. Overall, ambulance staff emphasised the need for IPC policies to be pragmatic, evidence-based and communicated with clarity. https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/12/Suppl_1/A1.2 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/openhrt-2015-000281
dc.publisherBMJen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectPandemicsen_US
dc.subjectPandemic Practiceen_US
dc.subjectPersonal Protective Equipment (PPE)en_US
dc.subjectSurveys and Questionnairesen_US
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectParamedic as a Professionen_US
dc.title'Family members screaming for help makes it very difficult to don PPE.' a qualitative report on ambulance staff experiences of personal protective equipment (PPE) use and infection prevention and control (IPC) practices during the Covid-19 pandemicen_US
dc.source.journaltitleBMJ Openen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2023-05-01
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1136/bmjopen-2022-EMS.2en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2023-01-31
rioxxterms.typeConference Paper/Proceeding/Abstracten_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2022-05-01
html.description.abstractBackground The COVID-19 Ambulance Response Assessment (CARA) study was a prospective, longitudinal survey of UK ambulance staff during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. CARA aimed to evaluate perceptions of preparedness and wellbeing, and to collect staff suggestions to benefit working practices and conditions. Method Three online questionnaires were presented, coinciding with the acceleration, peak and deceleration phases of the first COVID-19 wave in 2020. Inductive thematic analysis was employed to represent 14,237 free text responses from 3,717 participants to 18 free-text questions overall. This report focuses on experiences of IPC practices. Results Many participants lacked confidence in using PPE because of low familiarity, an inadequate evidence-base and changing policy. Some experienced insufficient supply, items of poor quality and suboptimal fit-testing procedure. PPE use was further influenced by discomfort, urgency, and perceptions of risk. Various suggestions were made to improve IPC practices, including decontamination personnel, staff 'bubbles' and limiting exposure through public education and remote triage improvements. Conclusion Repeated poor experiences of implementing IPC practices1 2 demand that lessons are learnt from this pandemic. PPE developed with specific regard for ambulance staff 's unique working environment and for them to receive regular familiarization training in its use would likely benefit performance and confidence. Overall, ambulance staff emphasised the need for IPC policies to be pragmatic, evidence-based and communicated with clarity. https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/12/Suppl_1/A1.2 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/openhrt-2015-000281en_US


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