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dc.contributor.authorHodkinson, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-31T15:02:50Z
dc.date.available2020-07-31T15:02:50Z
dc.date.issued2010-08
dc.identifier.citationHodkinson, M. 2010. The future of paramedic intubation: who should be responsible? Journal of Paramedic Practice, 2 (8), 358-362.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1759-1376
dc.identifier.issn2041-9457
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/jpar.2010.2.8.78008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/906
dc.description.abstractPrehospital airway management in trauma patients has been the subject of debate among many professionals for a number of years. At present, the gold standard for airway management and optimal ventilation is endotracheal intubation. Paramedics, as the frontline prehospital care providers, are currently able to practice endotracheal intubation in order to secure an airway, but only when the patient is comatose with no gag reflex. Training in endotracheal intubation has been under close scrutiny by regulatory bodies such as the Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Service Liaison Committee, with emphasis on using other techniques to secure the airway, including supra-glottic airway devices. Rapid sequence induction and drug assisted airway management is only carried out by doctors working in the prehospital arena. However, a number of studies document that paramedics are more than capable of carrying out successful rapid sequence induction in trauma patients. This article considers the training received by paramedics in airway management, techniques that are employed and the influence of current literature on the debate over paramedic endotracheal intubation. Abstract published with permission.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectTraumaen_US
dc.subjectAirway Managementen_US
dc.subjectIntubationen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.titleThe future of paramedic intubation: who should be responsible?en_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Paramedic Practiceen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-05-28
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-05-28
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2013-09-29
html.description.abstractPrehospital airway management in trauma patients has been the subject of debate among many professionals for a number of years. At present, the gold standard for airway management and optimal ventilation is endotracheal intubation. Paramedics, as the frontline prehospital care providers, are currently able to practice endotracheal intubation in order to secure an airway, but only when the patient is comatose with no gag reflex. Training in endotracheal intubation has been under close scrutiny by regulatory bodies such as the Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Service Liaison Committee, with emphasis on using other techniques to secure the airway, including supra-glottic airway devices. Rapid sequence induction and drug assisted airway management is only carried out by doctors working in the prehospital arena. However, a number of studies document that paramedics are more than capable of carrying out successful rapid sequence induction in trauma patients. This article considers the training received by paramedics in airway management, techniques that are employed and the influence of current literature on the debate over paramedic endotracheal intubation. Abstract published with permission.en_US


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