Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHitt, Andy
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-15T17:03:23Z
dc.date.available2020-07-15T17:03:23Z
dc.date.issued2009-12-18
dc.identifier.citationHitt, A. 2009. Patient assessment: a reflective case study. Journal of Paramedic Practice, 1 (15), 622-626.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1759-1376
dc.identifier.issn2041-9457
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/jpar.2009.1.15.45768
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/834
dc.description.abstractThe three ‘C's of physical assessment—capacity, consent and communication—could be compared to the ‘ABCs' of resuscitation; without all three you will make very little, if any, progress. But do we give these aspects the attention they deserve, especially in time critical situations? This case study is based on a 76-year-old female who presented at Accident and Emergency (A&E) with central chest pain, diarrhoea and vomiting, productive cough and pyrexia. The aims of this case study are to discuss the impact of 21st century legislation on patient assessment, demonstrate the importance of objective, structured history taken and investigate the subjective nature of physical examination. In a world of waiting lists and litigation some argue that we should let technology do the leg work—ultrasound, chest x-rays, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT)—why use a stethoscope? Abstract published with permission.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectConsenten_US
dc.subjectCommunicationen_US
dc.subjectPhysical Examinationen_US
dc.subjectPatient Outcome Assessmenten_US
dc.titlePatient assessment: a reflective case studyen_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Paramedic Practiceen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-07-09
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-07-09
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2013-09-29
html.description.abstractThe three ‘C's of physical assessment—capacity, consent and communication—could be compared to the ‘ABCs' of resuscitation; without all three you will make very little, if any, progress. But do we give these aspects the attention they deserve, especially in time critical situations? This case study is based on a 76-year-old female who presented at Accident and Emergency (A&E) with central chest pain, diarrhoea and vomiting, productive cough and pyrexia. The aims of this case study are to discuss the impact of 21st century legislation on patient assessment, demonstrate the importance of objective, structured history taken and investigate the subjective nature of physical examination. In a world of waiting lists and litigation some argue that we should let technology do the leg work—ultrasound, chest x-rays, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT)—why use a stethoscope? Abstract published with permission.en_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record