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dc.contributor.authorWarner, Stuart
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-29T15:25:51Z
dc.date.available2020-06-29T15:25:51Z
dc.date.issued2010-03
dc.identifier.citationWarner, S. 2010. Spinal injury: how should we immobilize in the prehospital environment? Journal of Paramedic Practice, 2 (3), 112-115.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1759-1376
dc.identifier.issn2041-9457
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/jpar.2010.2.3.47286
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/829
dc.description.abstractCorrect spinal immobilization is key to reducing the potential for further injury to the spinal cord. Effective management of actual injuries, or the potential for injury, has led to a protracted debate on which piece of equipment is fully fit for purpose. For the past 20 years, the UK ambulance service has been regularly using the rescue board (colloquially known as the ‘spinal board’) to immobilize patients. This paper seeks to review the current equipment and debate their appropriate applications. Abstract published with permission.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectSpinal Immobilisationen_US
dc.subjectSpinal Injuriesen_US
dc.subjectPre-hospital Careen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectOrthopedicsen_US
dc.titleSpinal injury: how should we immobilize in the prehospital environment?en_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Paramedic Practiceen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-06-15
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-06-15
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2013-09-29
html.description.abstractCorrect spinal immobilization is key to reducing the potential for further injury to the spinal cord. Effective management of actual injuries, or the potential for injury, has led to a protracted debate on which piece of equipment is fully fit for purpose. For the past 20 years, the UK ambulance service has been regularly using the rescue board (colloquially known as the ‘spinal board’) to immobilize patients. This paper seeks to review the current equipment and debate their appropriate applications. Abstract published with permission.en_US


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