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dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Samantha
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-12T11:11:42Z
dc.date.available2020-02-12T11:11:42Z
dc.date.issued2012-12-28
dc.identifier.citationTaylor, S., 2012. Right ventricular infarction in the pre-hospital setting: A hidden complication. Journal of Paramedic Practice, 4 (12), 693-697.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2041-9457
dc.identifier.issn1759-1376
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/jpar.2012.4.12.693
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/768
dc.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. Right ventricular infarction (RVI) can occur in isolation but is more commonly associated with inferior myocardial infarction (IMI). It has a higher mortality rate compared to isolated left ventricular infarction and often presents with complications. Early recognition of RVI in paramedic practice is key to decreasing patient mortality. This article focuses on RVI within the pre-hospital environment. Particular emphasis is placed on right precordial electrocardiogram (ECG) lead placement, judicious administration of intravenous fluids in the hypotensive patient, and specific complications associated with vasodilatory drugs in RVI.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectVentricular Dysfunctionen_US
dc.subjectElectrocardiogram (ECG)en_US
dc.subjectMyocardial Infarctionen_US
dc.subjectPre-hospital Careen_US
dc.subjectCardiac Arresten_US
dc.titleRight ventricular infarction in the pre-hospital setting: A hidden complicationen_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Paramedic Practiceen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-01-09
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.12968en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.uriAll Rights Reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-01-09
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2012-10-28
html.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. Right ventricular infarction (RVI) can occur in isolation but is more commonly associated with inferior myocardial infarction (IMI). It has a higher mortality rate compared to isolated left ventricular infarction and often presents with complications. Early recognition of RVI in paramedic practice is key to decreasing patient mortality. This article focuses on RVI within the pre-hospital environment. Particular emphasis is placed on right precordial electrocardiogram (ECG) lead placement, judicious administration of intravenous fluids in the hypotensive patient, and specific complications associated with vasodilatory drugs in RVI.en_US


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