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dc.contributor.authorGlencorse, Mark
dc.contributor.authorGlencorse, Sandra
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-11T17:00:39Z
dc.date.available2020-02-11T17:00:39Z
dc.date.issued2011-06
dc.identifier.citationGlencorse, M. and Glencorse, S., 2011. A review of the pre-ROSC intranasal cooling effectiveness study. Journal of Paramedic Practice, 3 (6), 291-297.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1759-1376
dc.identifier.issn2041-9457
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/jpar.2011.3.6.291
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/754
dc.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. With the publication of the 2010 European Resuscitation Council Guidelines, therapeutic hypothermia has been recommended as part of the treatment algorhythm for the management of adult cardiac arrest. As ambulance services around the world struggle to decide on the best method of cooling a patient at the time of the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), the ground-breaking ‘PRINCE’ study has been published describing the novel approach of ‘trans-nasal’ evaporative cooling during the peri-arrest period. This study describes a significant difference found on arrival at hospital between the mean tympanic temperatures of the two groups (cooled vs control) following a period of cooling (34.2 °C [SD 1.5 °C] vs 35.5 °C [SD 0.9 °C], P<0.001). In addition, when looking at survival to discharge following out-of-hospital (OOH) cardiac arrest, there was a statistically significant difference in a subgroup of patients where CPR was commenced within 10 minutes of cardiac arrest (56.5% of trans-nasally cooled patients survived to discharge compared with 29.4% of control patients (P=0.04, relative risk =1.9)). This article examines the PRINCE study and considers the implication of this method of inducing therapeutic hypothermia in the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patient within the UK.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectAdvanced Life Support (ALS)en_US
dc.subjectCardiac Arresten_US
dc.subjectInduced Hypothermiaen_US
dc.subjectIntranasal Drug Administrationen_US
dc.titleA review of the pre-ROSC intranasal cooling effectiveness studyen_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Paramedic Practiceen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-02-05
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-02-05
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2013-08
html.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. With the publication of the 2010 European Resuscitation Council Guidelines, therapeutic hypothermia has been recommended as part of the treatment algorhythm for the management of adult cardiac arrest. As ambulance services around the world struggle to decide on the best method of cooling a patient at the time of the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), the ground-breaking ‘PRINCE’ study has been published describing the novel approach of ‘trans-nasal’ evaporative cooling during the peri-arrest period. This study describes a significant difference found on arrival at hospital between the mean tympanic temperatures of the two groups (cooled vs control) following a period of cooling (34.2 °C [SD 1.5 °C] vs 35.5 °C [SD 0.9 °C], P<0.001). In addition, when looking at survival to discharge following out-of-hospital (OOH) cardiac arrest, there was a statistically significant difference in a subgroup of patients where CPR was commenced within 10 minutes of cardiac arrest (56.5% of trans-nasally cooled patients survived to discharge compared with 29.4% of control patients (P=0.04, relative risk =1.9)). This article examines the PRINCE study and considers the implication of this method of inducing therapeutic hypothermia in the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patient within the UK.en_US


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