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dc.contributor.authorMildenhall, Joanne
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-06T14:01:15Z
dc.date.available2020-02-06T14:01:15Z
dc.date.issued2012-06
dc.identifier.citationMildenhall, J., 2012. Occupational stress, paramedic informal coping strategies: a review of the literature. Journal of Paramedic Practice, 4 (6), 318-328.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1759-1376
dc.identifier.issn2041-9457
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/jpar.2012.4.6.318
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/727
dc.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. Frontline ambulance staff have high rates of sickness absence; far greater than any other National Health Service worker. Reports suggest that many of these instances are attributable to stress, anxiety and depression. Indeed, studies have observed that occupational stress is significant within the Ambulance Service. While academics frequently associate the causative factor as being related to traumatic incident exposure, there is a small, growing trend of researchers who have found that daily hassles are equally, if not a greater source of stress. Many of the studies investigating the psychological aftermath of a stressful occupational experience focus on formal coping strategies such as critical incident debriefing and trauma risk incident management. However, it has been found that paramedics often prefer to manage stressful feelings informally within their own occupational culture. This literature review explored these informal coping strategies, and found that cognitive mechanisms and peer support were the most used methods. Research in this domain is currently very limited; therefore, this review identifies several areas for further study.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectOccupational Stressen_US
dc.subjectParamedic Practiceen_US
dc.subjectWellbeingen_US
dc.subjectPsychological Wellbeingen_US
dc.subjectPsychological Traumaen_US
dc.titleOccupational stress, paramedic informal coping strategies: a review of the literatureen_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Paramedic Practiceen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-01-15
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-01-15
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2013-08
html.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. Frontline ambulance staff have high rates of sickness absence; far greater than any other National Health Service worker. Reports suggest that many of these instances are attributable to stress, anxiety and depression. Indeed, studies have observed that occupational stress is significant within the Ambulance Service. While academics frequently associate the causative factor as being related to traumatic incident exposure, there is a small, growing trend of researchers who have found that daily hassles are equally, if not a greater source of stress. Many of the studies investigating the psychological aftermath of a stressful occupational experience focus on formal coping strategies such as critical incident debriefing and trauma risk incident management. However, it has been found that paramedics often prefer to manage stressful feelings informally within their own occupational culture. This literature review explored these informal coping strategies, and found that cognitive mechanisms and peer support were the most used methods. Research in this domain is currently very limited; therefore, this review identifies several areas for further study.en_US


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