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dc.contributor.authorAllen, James
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-23T08:34:05Z
dc.date.available2020-01-23T08:34:05Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-12
dc.identifier.citationAllen, J. 2019. Human factors, cognitive bias and the paramedic. Journal of Paramedic Practice, 11 (1), 8–14.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1759-1376
dc.identifier.issn2041-9457
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/jpar.2019.11.1.8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/633
dc.description.abstractThe consequences of human factors and cognitive bias can be catastrophic if unrecognised. Errors can lead to loss of life because of the flawed nature of human cognition and the way we interact with our environment. Seemingly small mistakes or miscommunications can lead to negative outcomes for patients and clinicians alike. It is easy to see therefore why the College of Paramedics now recommends the teaching of human factors at higher education institutions. Using a problem-based approach, this article aims to inform prehospital clinicians about how human factors and cognitive bias can affect them and their practice, and how these can be mitigated. Abstract published with permission.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectHuman Factorsen_US
dc.subjectParamedic Practiceen_US
dc.subjectClinical Competenceen_US
dc.subjectOrganizational Cultureen_US
dc.titleHuman factors, cognitive bias and the paramedicen_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Paramedic Practiceen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-11-25
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-11-25
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2019-01-12
html.description.abstractThe consequences of human factors and cognitive bias can be catastrophic if unrecognised. Errors can lead to loss of life because of the flawed nature of human cognition and the way we interact with our environment. Seemingly small mistakes or miscommunications can lead to negative outcomes for patients and clinicians alike. It is easy to see therefore why the College of Paramedics now recommends the teaching of human factors at higher education institutions. Using a problem-based approach, this article aims to inform prehospital clinicians about how human factors and cognitive bias can affect them and their practice, and how these can be mitigated. Abstract published with permission.en_US


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