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dc.contributor.authorMcQueen, Carl
dc.contributor.authorApps, Richard
dc.contributor.authorMason, Fay
dc.contributor.authorCrombie, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorHulme, Jon
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-16T14:53:18Z
dc.date.available2020-01-16T14:53:18Z
dc.date.issued2013-11
dc.identifier.citationMcQueen, C. et al, 2013. ‘Interception’: a model for specialist prehospital care provision when helicopters are not available. Emergency Medicine Journal : EMJ, 30 (11), 956-957.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1472-0205
dc.identifier.issn1472-0213
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/emermed-2013-202989
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/565
dc.description.abstractThe deployment of specialist teams to incident scenes by helicopter and the delivery of critical care interventions such as Rapid Sequence Induction of anaesthesia to patients are becoming well-established components of trauma care in the UK. Traditionally in the UK, Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) are limited to daylight operations only. The safety and feasibility of operating HEMS services at night is a topic of debate currently in the UK HEMS community. Within the West Midlands Major Trauma Network, the Medical Emergency Response Incident Team (MERIT) provides a physician-led prehospital care service that responds to incidents by air during daylight hours and by Rapid Response Vehicle during the hours of darkness. The MERIT service is coordinated and supported by a dedicated Major Trauma Desk manned by a HEMS paramedic in the ambulance service control room. This case illustrates the importance of coordination and integration of specialist resources within a major trauma network to ensure the expedient delivery of HEMS-level care to patients outside of normal flying hours. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/30/11/956.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2013-202989
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectTrauma Managementen_US
dc.subjectHelicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS)en_US
dc.subjectPre-hospital Careen_US
dc.subjectTransportation of Patientsen_US
dc.title‘Interception’: a model for specialist prehospital care provision when helicopters are not availableen_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleEmergency Medicine Journal : EMJen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-12-11
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-12-11
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2013-11
html.description.abstractThe deployment of specialist teams to incident scenes by helicopter and the delivery of critical care interventions such as Rapid Sequence Induction of anaesthesia to patients are becoming well-established components of trauma care in the UK. Traditionally in the UK, Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) are limited to daylight operations only. The safety and feasibility of operating HEMS services at night is a topic of debate currently in the UK HEMS community. Within the West Midlands Major Trauma Network, the Medical Emergency Response Incident Team (MERIT) provides a physician-led prehospital care service that responds to incidents by air during daylight hours and by Rapid Response Vehicle during the hours of darkness. The MERIT service is coordinated and supported by a dedicated Major Trauma Desk manned by a HEMS paramedic in the ambulance service control room. This case illustrates the importance of coordination and integration of specialist resources within a major trauma network to ensure the expedient delivery of HEMS-level care to patients outside of normal flying hours. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/30/11/956.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2013-202989en_US


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