Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMullen, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-16T13:49:32Z
dc.date.available2020-01-16T13:49:32Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.citationMullen, R., 2013. Ambulance CPAP saves lives: why don't we use it? Journal of Paramedic Practice, 5 (12), 672-677.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1759-1376
dc.identifier.issn2041-9457
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/jpar.2013.5.12.672
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/554
dc.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an established in-hospital therapy for the treatment of multiple aetiologies of breathlessness, primarily for acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema (ACPE) due to acute exacerbations of congestive heart failure (CHF), but also (amongst others): exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma and pneumonia (Gray et al, 2009; Wesley et al, 2011). The use of CPAP as an adjunctive treatment for ACPE patients in front-line ambulances has been proven to improve patient outcome, preventing them from reaching the ‘point of no return’ and a downward spiral into total respiratory failure. This article will discuss current UK ambulance practice and examine the issues surrounding the introduction and use of CPAP as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of ACPE, secondary to acutely exacerbated CHF, whilst also briefly discussing its use in other aetiologies of breathlessness.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectAsthmaen_US
dc.subjectPneumoniaen_US
dc.subjectHeart Failureen_US
dc.subjectPulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructiveen_US
dc.titleAmbulance CPAP saves lives: why don't we use it?en_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Paramedic Practiceen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-12-12
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-12-12
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2013-12
html.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an established in-hospital therapy for the treatment of multiple aetiologies of breathlessness, primarily for acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema (ACPE) due to acute exacerbations of congestive heart failure (CHF), but also (amongst others): exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma and pneumonia (Gray et al, 2009; Wesley et al, 2011). The use of CPAP as an adjunctive treatment for ACPE patients in front-line ambulances has been proven to improve patient outcome, preventing them from reaching the ‘point of no return’ and a downward spiral into total respiratory failure. This article will discuss current UK ambulance practice and examine the issues surrounding the introduction and use of CPAP as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of ACPE, secondary to acutely exacerbated CHF, whilst also briefly discussing its use in other aetiologies of breathlessness.en_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record