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dc.contributor.authorClark, Sophie
dc.contributor.authorShaw, Joanna
dc.contributor.authorWrigley, Fenella
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-07T15:01:21Z
dc.date.available2020-01-07T15:01:21Z
dc.date.issued2014-02
dc.identifier.citationClark, S. and Shaw, J. and Wrigley, F., 2014. A clinical audit of the pre-hospital paediatric respiratory assessment in London. Journal of Paramedic Practice, 6 (2), 78-83.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1759-1376
dc.identifier.issn2041-9457
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/jpar.2014.6.2.78
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/505
dc.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. Assessing a child with difficulty in breathing is a challenge in a pre-hospital setting, especially children under 3 years old. Nevertheless, hypoxia must be treated early, and a respiratory assessment is essential to ensuring the well being of these patients. The aim of this audit was to update the research, as there have been changes in equipment and training since this was last addressed. A criterion-based clinical audit was undertaken of 253 patient report forms collected from the London Ambulance Service over a one-month period. The pre-hospital clinician must have coded dyspnoea (difficulty in breathing) and the patient’s age must be under three years. The observations audited were: respiratory rate, auscultation attempt and oxygen saturations, any exceptions were noted. The results showed that 85% (n=220) had two respiratory rates recorded, 70% (n = 178) recorded an auscultation attempt, whilst two oxygen saturation recordings were documented for 52% (n=131). The main reason for no oxygen saturations was ‘no kit’, accounting for 38% (n= 45) of the noncompliance. Overall, 39% (n=99) recorded all three observations in this audit. It was concluded that there has been progress since the last review; however, there is still potential for better compliance. Recording oxygen saturations especially needs improving and the availability of equipment requires addressing.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectClinical Auditen_US
dc.subjectPaediatricsen_US
dc.subjectHypoxiaen_US
dc.subjectRespirationen_US
dc.titleA clinical audit of the pre-hospital paediatric respiratory assessment in Londonen_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Paramedic Practiceen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-11-14
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-11-14
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2014-02
html.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. Assessing a child with difficulty in breathing is a challenge in a pre-hospital setting, especially children under 3 years old. Nevertheless, hypoxia must be treated early, and a respiratory assessment is essential to ensuring the well being of these patients. The aim of this audit was to update the research, as there have been changes in equipment and training since this was last addressed. A criterion-based clinical audit was undertaken of 253 patient report forms collected from the London Ambulance Service over a one-month period. The pre-hospital clinician must have coded dyspnoea (difficulty in breathing) and the patient’s age must be under three years. The observations audited were: respiratory rate, auscultation attempt and oxygen saturations, any exceptions were noted. The results showed that 85% (n=220) had two respiratory rates recorded, 70% (n = 178) recorded an auscultation attempt, whilst two oxygen saturation recordings were documented for 52% (n=131). The main reason for no oxygen saturations was ‘no kit’, accounting for 38% (n= 45) of the noncompliance. Overall, 39% (n=99) recorded all three observations in this audit. It was concluded that there has been progress since the last review; however, there is still potential for better compliance. Recording oxygen saturations especially needs improving and the availability of equipment requires addressing.en_US


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