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dc.contributor.authorFreshwater, Eleanor S.
dc.contributor.authorDickinson, Phillip
dc.contributor.authorCrouch, Robert
dc.contributor.authorDeakin, Charles D.
dc.contributor.authorEynon, C. Andy
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-07T14:50:46Z
dc.date.available2020-01-07T14:50:46Z
dc.date.issued2014-02
dc.identifier.citationFreshwater, E.S. et al, 2014. Extending access to specialist services: the impact of an onsite helipad and analysis of the first 100 flights. Emergency Medicine Journal : EMJ, 31 (2), 121-125.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1472-0205
dc.identifier.issn1472-0213
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/emermed-2012-201948
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/503
dc.description.abstractBackground In November 2011, University Hospital Southampton (UHS), now a major trauma centre, opened its onsite helipad, allowing patients to be brought to the emergency department (ED) directly by air ambulance. Prior to this, helicopters were required to land at a local playing field and the patient had to be transferred by land ambulance. This study aims to investigate the impact this change in practice has had on the flow of patients to the ED. Methods The authors completed a retrospective case analysis of the first 100 patients brought directly to UHS by helicopter. Data were obtained from ED notes and helicopter provider databases. Analysis was conducted on the type of incident and appropriateness of referral. Incident locations were plotted geographically. Results 100 patients arrived at UHS ED by helicopter between 17 November 2011 and 31 March 2012. Of these, 79 were primary helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) missions and 21 were secondary transfers from other hospitals. Of the HEMS patients, 38 were likely to have been transported to another hospital, had there not been an onsite helipad at UHS. 29 passed another suitable receiving hospital en route and therefore may have come to UHS for speciality services. Conclusions The provision of an onsite, 24 h helipad facility at UHS has resulted in a significant number of patients being transported to the hospital by helicopter who might otherwise have attended an alternative hospital. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/31/2/121.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2012-201948
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectAir Ambulancesen_US
dc.subjectTransportation of Patientsen_US
dc.subjectTrauma Centresen_US
dc.subjectHelicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS)en_US
dc.titleExtending access to specialist services: the impact of an onsite helipad and analysis of the first 100 flightsen_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleEmergency Medicine Journalen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-11-14
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-11-14
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2014-02
html.description.abstractBackground In November 2011, University Hospital Southampton (UHS), now a major trauma centre, opened its onsite helipad, allowing patients to be brought to the emergency department (ED) directly by air ambulance. Prior to this, helicopters were required to land at a local playing field and the patient had to be transferred by land ambulance. This study aims to investigate the impact this change in practice has had on the flow of patients to the ED. Methods The authors completed a retrospective case analysis of the first 100 patients brought directly to UHS by helicopter. Data were obtained from ED notes and helicopter provider databases. Analysis was conducted on the type of incident and appropriateness of referral. Incident locations were plotted geographically. Results 100 patients arrived at UHS ED by helicopter between 17 November 2011 and 31 March 2012. Of these, 79 were primary helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) missions and 21 were secondary transfers from other hospitals. Of the HEMS patients, 38 were likely to have been transported to another hospital, had there not been an onsite helipad at UHS. 29 passed another suitable receiving hospital en route and therefore may have come to UHS for speciality services. Conclusions The provision of an onsite, 24 h helipad facility at UHS has resulted in a significant number of patients being transported to the hospital by helicopter who might otherwise have attended an alternative hospital. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/31/2/121.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2012-201948en_US


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