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dc.contributor.authorMcClelland, Graham
dc.contributor.authorJones, Jacqui
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-06T19:57:52Z
dc.date.available2019-11-06T19:57:52Z
dc.date.issued2015-09
dc.identifier.citationMcClelland, G. and Jones, J., 2015. A pilot study exploring the accuracy of pre-hospital sepsis recognition in the North East Ambulance Service. Journal of Paramedic Practice, 7 (9), 459-465.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1759-1376
dc.identifier.issn2041-9457
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/jpar.2015.7.9.459
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/436
dc.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. Background: Over the past decade there has been a focus on improving pre-hospital recognition and treatment of patients with sepsis. This pilot study investigates pre-hospital sepsis recognition, including the use of a Sepsis Screening Tool (SST), treatment and whether timely identification influenced the time to treatment and outcome at the receiving unit. Methods: A cross-sectional sample of patients with a documented suspicion of sepsis by North East Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust (NEAS) was combined and cross referenced with patients coded for sepsis at The James Cook University Hospital (JCUH) to generate a sample of sepsis patients seen within January 2014. NEAS sepsis recognition was compared with SST identification by retrospectively examining patients’ medical records. Sensitivity and specificity for NEAS diagnosis were calculated by comparing NEAS identification with JCUH diagnosis using the hospital SST. Results: The sample included 49 patients from January 2014. NEAS correctly identified 18/42 patients with sepsis (43% sensitivity, 14% specificity). NEAS correctly identified 8/27 patients with severe sepsis (30% sensitivity, 77% specificity). Conclusions: It is evident that NEAS clinicians diagnose sepsis without consistently using the SST. Use of the SST would improve the ability of NEAS clinicians to identify patients with sepsis.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectSepsisen_US
dc.subjectDiagnostic Techniques and Proceduresen_US
dc.subjectPre-hospital Careen_US
dc.subjectScreeningsen_US
dc.titleA pilot study exploring the accuracy of pre-hospital sepsis recognition in the North East Ambulance Serviceen_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Paramedic Practiceen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-09-24
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-09-24
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2015-09
html.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. Background: Over the past decade there has been a focus on improving pre-hospital recognition and treatment of patients with sepsis. This pilot study investigates pre-hospital sepsis recognition, including the use of a Sepsis Screening Tool (SST), treatment and whether timely identification influenced the time to treatment and outcome at the receiving unit. Methods: A cross-sectional sample of patients with a documented suspicion of sepsis by North East Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust (NEAS) was combined and cross referenced with patients coded for sepsis at The James Cook University Hospital (JCUH) to generate a sample of sepsis patients seen within January 2014. NEAS sepsis recognition was compared with SST identification by retrospectively examining patients’ medical records. Sensitivity and specificity for NEAS diagnosis were calculated by comparing NEAS identification with JCUH diagnosis using the hospital SST. Results: The sample included 49 patients from January 2014. NEAS correctly identified 18/42 patients with sepsis (43% sensitivity, 14% specificity). NEAS correctly identified 8/27 patients with severe sepsis (30% sensitivity, 77% specificity). Conclusions: It is evident that NEAS clinicians diagnose sepsis without consistently using the SST. Use of the SST would improve the ability of NEAS clinicians to identify patients with sepsis.en_US


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