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dc.contributor.authorSeligman, William H.
dc.contributor.authorGanatra, Sameer
dc.contributor.authorEngland, David
dc.contributor.authorBlack, John J.M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-12T09:29:41Z
dc.date.available2019-06-12T09:29:41Z
dc.date.issued2016-02
dc.identifier.citationSeligman, W.H. et al, 2016. Initial experience in setting up a medical student first responder scheme in South Central England. Emergency medicine journal : EMJ, 33, 155-158.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1472-0205
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/emermed-2015-204638
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/40
dc.description.abstractPrehospital emergency medicine (PHEM) is a recently recognised subspecialty of emergency medicine, and anaesthetics, intensive care and acute medicine, in the UK, and yet it receives little to no mention in many undergraduate medical curricula. However, there is growing interest in PHEM among medical students and junior doctors. Several programmes are in existence across the UK that serve to provide teaching and exposure of prehospital care to medical students and junior doctors. However, relatively few students are able to gain significant first-hand experience of treating patients in the prehospital phase. In this short report, we discuss our experience of launching the student first responder (SFR) scheme across three counties in the Thames Valley. Medical students are trained by the regional ambulance service and respond to life-threatening medical emergencies in an ambulance response vehicle. The scheme is likely to benefit the ambulance service by providing a wider pool of trained volunteer first responders able to attend to emergency calls, to benefit patients by providing a quick response at their time of need, and to benefit medical students by providing first-hand experience of medical emergencies in the community. In its first 15 months of operation, SFRs were dispatched to 343 incidents. This scheme can serve as a training model for other ambulance services and medical schools across the UK. https://emj.bmj.com/content/33/2/155.long This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi: 10.1136/emermed-2015-204638
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectAmbulancesen_US
dc.subjectAlgorithmsen_US
dc.subjectStudents, Medicalen_US
dc.subjectProgram Developmenten_US
dc.titleInitial experience in setting up a medical student first responder scheme in South Central England.en_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleEmergency medicine journal : EMJen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-06-12
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1136/emermed-2015-204638en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-06-12
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2015-08
html.description.abstractPrehospital emergency medicine (PHEM) is a recently recognised subspecialty of emergency medicine, and anaesthetics, intensive care and acute medicine, in the UK, and yet it receives little to no mention in many undergraduate medical curricula. However, there is growing interest in PHEM among medical students and junior doctors. Several programmes are in existence across the UK that serve to provide teaching and exposure of prehospital care to medical students and junior doctors. However, relatively few students are able to gain significant first-hand experience of treating patients in the prehospital phase. In this short report, we discuss our experience of launching the student first responder (SFR) scheme across three counties in the Thames Valley. Medical students are trained by the regional ambulance service and respond to life-threatening medical emergencies in an ambulance response vehicle. The scheme is likely to benefit the ambulance service by providing a wider pool of trained volunteer first responders able to attend to emergency calls, to benefit patients by providing a quick response at their time of need, and to benefit medical students by providing first-hand experience of medical emergencies in the community. In its first 15 months of operation, SFRs were dispatched to 343 incidents. This scheme can serve as a training model for other ambulance services and medical schools across the UK. https://emj.bmj.com/content/33/2/155.long This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi: 10.1136/emermed-2015-204638en_US


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