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dc.contributor.authorMcClelland, Graham
dc.contributor.authorYounger, Paul
dc.contributor.authorHaworth, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-10T12:27:53Z
dc.date.available2019-10-10T12:27:53Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.citationMcClelland, G. and Younger, P. and Haworth, D., 2016. How do paramedics learn to intubate? British Paramedic Journal, 1 (1), 35-41.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1478-4726
dc.identifier.doi10.29045/14784726.2016.05.1.1.35
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/333
dc.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. A short cut review was carried out to establish what education and training are required for paramedics to gain initial competence in the skill of endotracheal intubation. Nineteen studies were identified with relevance to the question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these papers are tabulated. It is difficult to isolate intubation from the wider subject of airway management and the range of skills and techniques necessary to safely secure the airway in the prehospital setting. The evidence presented suggests that at least 25–35 intubations are necessary, as part of a wider programme of training, to gain initial competence in this skill.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectIntubationen_US
dc.subjectParamedicsen_US
dc.subjectMedical Educationen_US
dc.titleHow do paramedics learn to intubate?en_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleBritish Paramedic Journalen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-09-11
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-09-11
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2016-05
html.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. A short cut review was carried out to establish what education and training are required for paramedics to gain initial competence in the skill of endotracheal intubation. Nineteen studies were identified with relevance to the question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these papers are tabulated. It is difficult to isolate intubation from the wider subject of airway management and the range of skills and techniques necessary to safely secure the airway in the prehospital setting. The evidence presented suggests that at least 25–35 intubations are necessary, as part of a wider programme of training, to gain initial competence in this skill.en_US


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