• Ambulance over-conveyance to the emergency department: a large data analysis of ambulance journeys

      Miles, Jamie; O'Keefe, Colin; Jacques, Richard; Stone, Tony; Mason, Suzanne (2018-04-16)
      Over-conveyance by the ambulance service is a compounding factor of emergency department (ED) crowding. Previous solutions have focused on specific patient groups which have a limited impact when compared to the whole urgent and emergency care system. This study aims to analyse non-urgent conveyances by the ambulance service that could be suitable for discharge on-scene. https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/8/Suppl_1/A22.3. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-EMS.59
    • Bypassing nearest hospital for more distant neuroscience care in head-injured adults with suspected traumatic brain injury: findings of the head injury transportation straight to neurosurgery (HITS-NS) pilot cluster randomised trial

      Lecky, Fiona E.; Russell, Wanda; McClelland, Graham; Pennington, Elspeth; Fuller, Gordon W.; Goodacre, Steve; Han, Kyee; Curran, Andrew; Holliman, Damian; Chapman, Nathan; et al. (2017-10)
      Objective Reconfiguration of trauma services, with direct transport of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) to specialist neuroscience centres (SNCs)— bypassing non-specialist acute hospitals (NSAHs), could improve outcomes. However, delays in stabilisation of airway, breathing and circulation (ABC) may worsen outcomes when compared with selective secondary transfer from nearest NSAH to SNC. We conducted a pilot cluster randomised controlled trial to determine the feasibility and plausibility of bypassing suspected patients with TBI —directly into SNCs—producing a measurable effect. Setting Two English Ambulance Services. Participants 74 clusters (ambulance stations) were randomised within pairs after matching for important characteristics. Clusters enrolled head-injured adults— injured nearest to an NSAH—with internationally accepted TBI risk factors and stable ABC. We excluded participants attended by Helicopter Emergency Medical Services or who were injured more than 1 hour by road from nearest SNC. Interventions Intervention cluster participants were transported directly to an SNC bypassing nearest NSAH; control cluster participants were transported to nearest NSAH with selective secondary transfer to SNC. Outcomes Trial recruitment rate (target n=700 per annum) and percentage with TBI on CT scan (target 80%) were the primary feasibility outcomes. 30-day mortality, 6-month Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale and quality of life were secondary outcomes. Results 56 ambulance station clusters recruited 293 patients in 12 months. The trial arms were similar in terms of age, conscious level and injury severity. Less than 25% of recruited patients had TBI on CT (n=70) with 7% (n=20) requiring neurosurgery. Complete case analysis showed similar 30-day mortality in the two trial arms (control=8.8 (2.7–14.0)% vs intervention=9.4(2.3–14.0)%). Conclusion Bypassing patients with suspected TBI to SNCs gives an overtriage (false positive) ratio of 13:1 for neurosurgical intervention and 4:1 for TBI. A measurable effect from a full trial of early neuroscience care following bypass is therefore unlikely https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/bmjopen/7/10/e016355.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016355
    • Can emergency medical service staff predict the disposition of patients they are transporting?

      Clesham, K.; Mason, S.; Gray, J.; Walters, S.; Cooke, V. (2008-10-08)
      Emergency medical service (EMS) staff in the UK routinely transport all emergency responses to the nearest emergency department (ED). Proposed reforms in the ambulance service mean that EMS staff will transport patients not necessarily to the nearest hospital, but to one providing facilities that the patient is judged to require. No previous UK studies have evaluated how accurately EMS staff can predict which transported patients will require admission to hospital. https://emj.bmj.com/content/25/10/691 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2007.054924
    • Exploring ambulance conveyances to the emergency department: a descriptive analysis of non-urgent transports

      Miles, Jamie; O'Keeffe, Colin; Jacques, Richard; Stone, Tony; Mason, Suzanne (2017-12)
      An NHS England report highlighted key issues in how patients were initially navigating access to healthcare. This has manifested in increased pressure on ambulance services and emergency departments (EDs) to provide high quality, safe and efficient services to manage this demand. This study aims to identify non-urgent conveyances by ambulance services to the ED that would be suitable for care at scene or an alternative response. https://emj.bmj.com/content/34/12/A872. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2017-207308.17
    • Improving patient care - the Leeds dedicated palliative care ambulance service

      Borrill, Deborah; Colam-Ainsworth, Will (2014-03)
      Background Leeds have benefited from a bespoke palliative care ambulance service since 2007 when work done with Marie Curie and the “Delivering Choice” programme highlighted the need for the service. Early consultation with stakeholders identified that a lack of appropriate ambulance transport can be one of the factors that restricts or prevents the fulfilment of a patient’s previously expressed wish to die in the place of their choice. Aim The aim of the dedicated palliative care ambulance service is to provide flexible, prompt, safe and comfortable transport to patients moving to a place of their choice towards the end of life and to those needing palliative treatments and investigations. Method The Hospital Specialist Palliative Care Team, Leeds Commissioners, Yorkshire Ambulance Service (YAS) Leeds Hospices and Leeds Community Health worked closely together at a local level to improve the present palliative care ambulance service. Leeds commissioners have now funded a second ambulance to run on weekdays, covering the busiest times and new dedicated crews have been recruited and trained by the local hospice. Results This service will benefit patients, carers, healthcare professionals and healthcare providers by: Helping patients achieve their choice for place of care by reducing delays in discharge caused by restrictions to transport Ensuring appropriately trained ambulance personnel will provide quality care services to patients at the end of life during transportation Providing effective ways of working with professionals Providing better coordination and connectivity between hospital, hospice, community and ambulance services Conclusion In providing patients with choice in place of care at the end of life, whilst improving service provision, it is expected that the number of patients dying at home will increase. Future plans are to monitor present demand with a view to expanding the service further to support the transfer of palliative patients in Leeds. https://search.proquest.com/docview/1783985419/fulltextPDF/EBB9E264BEB34F77PQ/1?accountid=48092. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2014-000654.21
    • A Pilot Study of the Impact of NHS Patient Transportation on Older People with Dementia

      Roberts, Nicola; Curran, Stephen; Minogue, Virginia; Shewan, Jane; Spencer, Rebecca; Wattis, John (2010-06-14)
    • Relationship between hospital characteristics and survival outcomes in out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients treated and transported by Yorkshire Ambulance Service (YAS)

      Platt, Anthony (2019-09-24)
      Background There is mounting evidence that post resuscitation care, should include early angiography and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) in OHCA where a cardiac cause is suspected. In Yorkshire, the ambulance service can transport patients with a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), directly to a regional PPCI unit, if their ECG shows ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and the PPCI units accept. The aim of this study was to evaluate transport decisions, hospital characteristics and outcome in the form of 30 day survival rates of post-ROSC patients with presumed cardiac aetiology. Methods OHCA patient care records (PCRs) between January and July 2017 were reviewed. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they were: an adult non-traumatic OHCA: achieved ROSC on scene, and were transported to hospital. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. Results 478 patients met the inclusion criteria. 361/478 (75.6%) patients had an ECG recorded, with 149/361 (41.3%) documented cases of STEMI and 88/149 (59.1%) referred to a PPCI unit. 40/88 (45.5%) of referrals made were accepted by PPCI. Patients taken directly to PPCI were most likely to survive to 30 days (25/39, 53.8%). 34/126 (27.0%) patients survived to 30 days after transport to an emergency department (ED) at a PPCI- capable hospital, and 50/310 (16.1%) survived if taken to ED at a non-PPCI capable hospital. Conclusion Work is required to ensure post-ROSC patients receive a 12 lead ECG, and those with STEMI are referred to PPCI, as survival was greatest in this group. 30 day survival was better for patients taken to ED at a hospital with PPCI facilities, than an ED at a general hospital. Discussion needs to take place between YAS and the relevant hospitals in the region to ensure patients are transported to the appropriate destination., https://emj.bmj.com/content/36/10/e6.1 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2019-999abs.11
    • Thinking on scene: using vignettes to assess the accuracy and rationale of paramedic decision making

      Miles, Jamie; Coster, Joanne; Jacques, Richard (2018-04-16)
      Paramedics make important decisions on-scene as to whether a patient requires transport to hospital, referred, or discharged on scene. Research shows that nearly 20% of patients brought to ED by ambulance, could be treated elsewhere. This study aims to investigate the accuracy of conveyance decisions made by on-scene paramedics. https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/8/Suppl_1/A23.3 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-EMS.62.