• Exploring the developmental need for a paramedic pathway to mental health

      Elliott, Ruth; Brown, Paul (2013-05)
      Abstract published with permission. The following article discusses an organisational development need of a national ‘Mental Health Pathway’ to enable paramedics to provide the appropriate care for people who present mental health issues. The Department of Health acknowledges the huge modernisation of the ambulance service in England and faster access to people with immediate life-threatening conditions; however, the service is also responding to an increasing number of patients who have an urgent primary care need, which includes mental distress, as opposed to clinical emergency. The Department of Health (2009) policy calls for a ‘new vision’, where the ambulance service could increase efficiency and effectiveness towards patients who are experiencing non life-threatening emergencies. The key aims are to form a programme of advancement to address both improving mental health and accessibility of services for people with poor mental health. The vision of the policy is that by 2020 mental and physical health will have equal priority. The development of a mental health pathway within the ambulance service may help to reduce admissions or re-attendance, while improving care for patients. An evidence-based approach is used to provide a balanced, logical and supported argument within a reflection of practice. This is evaluated against a hypothetical patient’s case study, which reflects common issues faced by paramedics and ambulance technicians. The analytical process considers patient, professional, organisational and multi-disciplinary team perspectives.
    • Individualised nursing support reduces mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes following severe hypoglycaemia requiring ambulance attendance

      Kulavarasalingam, K.; Whittam, B.; Cassidy, S.; james, cathryn; Baxter, Paul; Pearson, S.; Ajjan, Ramzi A. (2018-10)
    • Introduction of non-transport guidelines into an ambulance service: a retrospective review

      Gray, J.T.; Wardrope, Jim (2007-10)
      Recent government policy has looked at improving the role of ambulance services in delivering alternative care models for patients. https://emj.bmj.com/content/24/10/727. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI 10.1136/emj.2007.048850
    • Pain: understanding the biopsychosocial model and the paramedic’s role within the multi-disciplinary team

      Parkinson, Martin (2015-05)
      Abstract published with permission. Pain, and its consequent management, is a major factor in today’s ambulance service, with up to 50% of patients reporting pain among their symptoms when contacting the emergency service. This article explores the role of the paramedic within the multi-disciplinary team and asks the question: ‘What is the appropriate treatment?’ A study of the biopsychosocial model shows that modern clinicians who focus solely on the biomedical model are under-treating the patient’s pain by ignoring the psychological and sociological aspects. All this belies a culture of pain management where recognition and treatments of painful conditions bias heavily on some diseases while ignoring or dismissing others. This can, in the eyes of patients, make the individuals complicit with the neglect of painful and life-altering conditions that may permanently change the patients focus and aspirations for the future, and disconnect the patient from the people that are there to help them.