• What are emergency ambulance services doing to meet the needs of people who call frequently? A national survey of current practice in the United Kingdom

      Snooks, Helen; Khanom, Ashrafunnesa; Cole, Robert; Edwards, Adrian; Edwards, Bethan Mair; Evans, Bridie A.; Foster, Theresa; Fothergill, Rachael; Gripper, Carol P.; Hampton, Chelsey; et al. (2019-12-28)
    • What fluids are given during air ambulance treatment of patients with trauma in the UK, and what might this mean for the future? Results from the RESCUER observational cohort study

      Naumann, David N.; Hancox, James M.; Raitt, James; Smith, Iain M.; Crombie, Nicholas; Doughty, Heidi; Perkins, Gavin D.; Midwinter, Mark J.; RESCUER Collaborators (2018-01)
      Objectives We investigated how often intravenous fluids have been delivered during physician-led prehospital treatment of patients with hypotensive trauma in the UK and which fluids were given. These data were used to estimate the potential national requirement for prehospital blood products (PHBP) if evidence from ongoing trials were to report clinical superiority. Setting The Regional Exploration of Standard Care during Evacuation Resuscitation (RESCUER) retrospective observational study was a collaboration between 11 UK air ambulance services. Each was invited to provide up to 5 years of data and total number of taskings during the same period. Participants Patients with hypotensive trauma (systolic blood pressure <90mm Hg or absent radial pulse) attended by a doctor. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome was the number of patients with hypotensive trauma given prehospital fluids. Secondary outcomes were types and volumes of fluids. These data were combined with published data to estimate potential national eligibility for PHBP. Results Of 29037 taskings, 729 (2.5%) were for patients with hypotensive trauma attended by a physician. Half were aged 21–50 years; 73.4% were male. A total of 537 out of 729 (73.7%) were given fluids. Five hundred and ten patients were given a single type of fluid; 27 received >1type. The most common fluid was 0.9% saline, given to 486/537 (90.5%) of patients who received fluids, at a median volume of 750 (IQR 300–1500)mL. Three per cent of patients received PHBP. Estimated projections for patients eligible for PHBP at these 11 services and in the whole UK were 313 and 794 patients per year, respectively. Conclusions One in 40 air ambulance taskings were manned by physicians to retrievepatients with hypotensive trauma. The most common fluid delivered was 0.9% saline. If evidence justifies universal provision of PHBP, approximately 800 patients/year would be eligible in the UK, based on our data combined with others published. Prospective investigations are required to confirm or adjust these estimations. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5786144/pdf/bmjopen-2017-019627.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019627
    • What happened on Restart a Heart Day 2017 in England?

      Brown, Terry P.; Perkins, Gavin D.; Lockey, Andrew S.; Soar, Jasmeet; Askew, Sara; Mersom, Frank; Fothergill, Rachael; Cox, Emma; Black, Sarah; Lumley-Holmes, Jenny (2018-09)
    • ‘What is the rate of general practitioner registration amongst homeless patients who present to an English ambulance service?’

      Miller, Joshua; McBride, Shaun (2020-10)
      Marginalised groups such as homeless people and migrants experience barriers to registration with a general practitioner (GP). While various interventions have been trialed to improve registration rates, the potential for opportunistic interventions through the ambulance service has not yet been considered. The aim of this study was to determine the scope for these interventions by researching the prevalence of GP registration amongst the homeless population that present to a regional English ambulance service that covers both rural and urban areas. https://emj.bmj.com/content/37/10/e3.2 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2020-999abs.4
    • Who receives bystander CPR in a witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in England

      Brown, Terry P.; Booth, Scott; Hawkes, Claire A.; Fothergill, Rachael; Black, Sarah; Pocock, Helen; Gunson, Imogen; Soar, Jasmeet; Mark, Julian; Perkins, Gavin D. (2018-09)