• Data quality and 30-day survival for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the UK out-of-hospital cardiac arrest registry: a data linkage study

      Rajagopal, Sangeerthana; Booth, Scott J.; Brown, Terry P.; Ji, Chen; Hawkes, Claire A.; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Kirby, Kim; Black, Sarah; Spaight, Robert; Gunson, Imogen; et al. (2017-11)
      Objectives The Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Outcomes (OHCAO) project aims to understand the epidemiology and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) across the UK. This data linkage study is a subproject of OHCAO. The aim was to establish the feasibility of linking OHCAO data to National Health Service (NHS) patient demographic data and Office for National Statistics (ONS) date of death data held on the NHS Personal Demographics Service (PDS) database to improve OHCAO demographic data quality and enable analysis of 30-day survival from OHCA. Design and setting Data were collected from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2014 as part of a prospective, observational study of OHCA attended by 10 English NHS Ambulance Services. 28 729 OHCA cases had resuscitation attempted by Emergency Medical Services and were included in the study. Data linkage was carried out using a data linkage service provided by NHS Digital, a national provider of health-related data. To assess data linkage feasibility a random sample of 3120 cases was selected. The sample was securely transferred to NHS Digital to be matched using OHCAO patient demographic data to return previously missing demographic data and provide ONS date of death data. Results A total of 2513 (80.5%) OHCAO cases were matched to patients in the NHS PDS database. Using the linkage process, missing demographic data were retrieved for 1636 (72.7%) out of 2249 OHCAO cases that had previously incomplete demographic data. Returned ONS date of death data allowed analysis of 30-day survival status. The results showed a 30-day survival rate of 9.3%, reducing unknown survival status from 46.1% to 8.5%. Conclusions In this sample, data linkage between the OHCAO registry and NHS PDS database was shown to be feasible, improving demographic data quality and allowing analysis of 30-day survival status. https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/bmjopen/7/11/e017784.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017784
    • Derivation and internal validation of the screening to enhance prehospital identification of sepsis (SEPSIS) score in adults on arrival at the emergency department

      Smyth, Michael A.; Gallacher, Daniel; Kimani, Peter K.; Ragoo, Mark; Ward, Matthew; Perkins, Gavin D. (2019-07-16)
    • The Diagnostic accuracy of prehospital assessment of acute respiratory failure

      Fuller, Gordon W.; Goodacre, Steve; Keating, Samuel; Herbert, Esther; Perkins, Gavin D.; Ward, Matthew; Rosser, Andy; Gunson, Imogen; Miller, Joshua; Bradburn, Mike; et al. (2020-12-01)
      Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a common medical emergency. Pre-hospital management includes controlled oxygen therapy, supplemented by specific management options directed at the underlying disease. The aim of the current study was to characterise the accuracy of paramedic diagnostic assessment in acute respiratory failure. Methods: A nested diagnostic accuracy and agreement study comparing pre-hospital clinical impression to the final hospital discharge diagnosis was conducted as part of the ACUTE (Ambulance CPAP: Use, Treatment effect and Economics) trial. Adults with suspected ARF were recruited from the UK West Midlands Ambulance Service. The pre-hospital clinical impression of the recruiting ambulance service clinician was prospectively recorded and compared to the final hospital diagnosis at 30 days. Agreement between pre-hospital and hospital diagnostic assessments was evaluated using raw agreement and Gwets AC1 coefficient. Results: 77 participants were included. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (32.9%) and lower respiratory tract infection (32.9%) were the most frequently suspected primary pre-hospital diagnoses for ARF, with secondary contributory conditions recorded in 36 patients (46.8%). There was moderate agreement between the primary pre-hospital and hospital diagnoses, with raw agreement of 58.5% and a Gwets AC1 coefficient of 0.56 (95% CI 0.43 to 0.69). In five cases, a non-respiratory final diagnosis was present, including: myocardial infarction, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, liver failure and sepsis. Conclusions: Pre-hospital assessment of ARF is challenging, with limited accuracy compared to the final hospital diagnosis. A syndromic approach, providing general supportive care, rather than a specifically disease-orientated treatment strategy, is likely to be most appropriate for the pre-hospital environment. Abstract published with permission.
    • Did West Midlands ambulance service paramedics’ usage of adrenaline change after the publication of the paramedic2 results, but prior to any guideline change? A service evaluation

      Gunson, Imogen M. (2020-10)
      This project evaluated whether practice change occurred amongst Paramedics directly after the publication of the PARAMEDIC2 trial, regarding adrenaline administration during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) without a change in guidelines. When Paramedics are exposed to a seminal publication there is anecdotal concern their autonomous practice changes, based on comprehension of findings ahead of potential guideline changes, however little evidence appraises whether this really occurs. https://emj.bmj.com/content/37/10/e4.3 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2020-999abs.7
    • Disaster rules

      Armitage, Ewan (2011-03)
    • Early intervention in psychiatry

      Armitage, Ewan (2015-03)
    • The effect of airway management on CPR quality in the PARAMEDIC2 randomised controlled trial

      Deakin, Charles; Nolan, Jerry P.; Ji, Chen; Fothergill, Rachael; Quinn, Tom; Rosser, Andy; Lall, Ranjit; Perkins`, Gavin (2020-11-12)
    • Effect of listening to Nellie the Elephant during CPR training on performance of chest compressions by lay people: randomised crossover trial

      Rawlins, Lettie; Woollard, Malcolm; Williams, Julia; Hallam, Phil (2009-12-14)
      Objectives To determine whether listening to music during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training increases the proportion of lay people delivering chest compressions of 100 per minute. Design Prospective randomised crossover trial. Setting Large UK university. Participants 130 volunteers (81 men) recruited on an opportunistic basis. Exclusion criteria included age under 18, trained health professionals, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training within the past three months. Interventions Volunteers performed three sequences of one minute of continuous chest compressions on a skill meter resuscitation manikin accompanied by no music, repeated choruses of Nellie the Elephant (Nellie), and That’s the Way (I like it) (TTW) according to a pre-randomised order. Main outcome measures Rate of chest compressions delivered (primary outcome), depth of compressions, proportion of incorrect compressions, and type of error. Results Median (interquartile range) compression rates were 110 (93-119) with no music, 105 (98-107) with Nellie, and 109 (103-110) with TTW. There were significant differences within groups between Nellie v no music and Nellie v TTW (P<0.001) but not no music v TTW (P=0.055). A compression rate of between 95 and 105 was achieved with no music, Nellie, and TTW for 15/130 (12%), 42/130 (32%), and 12/130 (9%) attempts, respectively. Differences in proportions were significant for Nellie v no music and Nellie v TTW (P<0.001) but not for no music v TTW (P=0.55). Relative risk for a compression rate between 95 and 105 was 2.8 (95% confidence interval 1.66 to 4.80) for Nellie v no music, 0.8 (0.40 to 1.62) for TTW v no music, and 3.5 (1.97 to 6.33) for Nellie v TTW. The number needed to treat for listening to Nellie v no music was 5 (4 to 10)—that is, the number of cardiac arrests required during which lay responders listen to Nellie to facilitate one patient receiving compressions at the correct rate (v no music) would be between four and 10. A greater proportion of compressions were too shallow when participants listened to Nellie v no music (56% v 47%, P=0.022). Conclusions Listening to Nellie the Elephant significantly increased the proportion of lay people delivering compression rates at close to 100 per minute. Unfortunately it also increased the proportion of compressions delivered at an inadequate depth. As current resuscitation guidelines give equal emphasis to correct rate and depth, listening to Nellie the Elephant as a learning aid during CPR training should be discontinued. Further research is required to identify music that, when played during CPR training, increases the proportion of lay responders providing chest compressions at both the correct rate and depth. https://www.bmj.com/content/339/bmj.b4707. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.b4707
    • The effects of adrenaline in out of hospital cardiac arrest with shockable and non-shockable rhythms: Findings from the PACA and PARAMEDIC-2 randomised controlled trials

      Perkins, Gavin D.; Kenna, Claire; Ji, Chen; Deakin, Charles D.; Nolan, Jerry P.; Quinn, Tom; Fothergill, Rachael; Gunson, Imogen; Pocock, Helen; Rees, Nigel; et al. (2019-07)
    • Emergencies in critical care

      Armitage, Ewan (2013-11)
    • Emergency ambulance services for heart attack and stroke during UK's COVID-19 lockdown

      Lumley-Holmes, Jenny; Brake, Simon; Docherty, Mark; Lilford, Richard; Watson, Sam (2020-05-23)
    • Emergency care in the streets

      Armitage, Ewan (2013-08)
    • Emergency surgery

      Armitage, Ewan (2011-02)
    • EMS pocket drug guide

      Armitage, Ewan (2013-07)
    • Enhanced care team response to incidents involving major trauma at night: are helicopters the answer?

      McQueen, Carl; Nutbeam, Tim; Crombie, Nicholas; Lecky, Fiona; Lawrence, Thomas; Hathaway, Karen; Wheaton, Steve (2015-07)
    • European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2015: Section 2. Adult basic life support and automated external defibrillation

      Perkins, Gavin D.; Handley, Anthony J.; Koster, Rudolph W.; Castren, Maaret; Smyth, Michael A.; Olasveengen, Theresa; Monsieurs, Koenraad G.; Raffay, Violetta; Grasner, Jan-Thorsten; Wenzel, Volker; et al. (2015-10)