• ABC of hypertension

      Armitage, Ewan (2015-11)
    • ABC of Patient Safety

      Armitage, Ewan (2011-10)
    • Ambulance care essentials

      Armitage, Ewan (2016-01)
    • Evaluation of the use of portfolios in paramedic practice: part 1

      Armitage, Ewan (2011-05)
      Abstract published with permission. 2009 saw the first audit of paramedic portfolios by the Health Professions Council (HPC) and later this year, the second national audit will take place. In the first of a two-part evaluation of the use of portfolios in paramedic practice, the history of professional portfolios is chartered including their current position within the paramedic profession. A number of contemporary issues with portfolios are identified, including format and how they relate to a paramedic's continuing professional development. The impact of the Knowledge and Skills Framework on portfolio use is also discussed.
    • Evaluation of the use of portfolios in paramedic practice: part 2

      Armitage, Ewan (2011-06)
      Abstract published with permission. This second of a two-part evaluation on the use of portfolios in paramedic practice, focuses on what constitutes evidence of a paramedic's competence and ultimate fitness to practice. A variety of evaluation models are identified to help in this process and this is developed further with reference to some educational theories. In the final part of the evaluation, the author proposes a number of recommendations concerning the use of portfolios within the paramedic profession and draws on the issues identified in the first part of the evaluation to summarize the current position of paramedic portfolios.
    • Lights, camera, disciplinary action?

      Mursell, Ian (2012-02)
      Abstract published with permission. There seldom appears to be a day go by without the opportunity to watch ourselves or colleagues in the latest episode of ‘Emergency Hero Rescues’ or similar ‘real life’ television programmes. However, the growth of such shows and inherent public interest in the emergency services brings to light the question of whether such media coverage is of benefit or risk to our profession. For many of us, watching such programmes is a guilty pleasure, we don't want to watch, but are strangely drawn to them. How many times have you found yourself ‘tutting’ at the TV or shaking your head pointing out the error of our peer's actions? Regardless of our reactions to such programmes, public interest is difficult to deny and as such, television coverage of prehospital care is a subject for careful consideration.
    • Occupational Emergency Medicine

      Armitage, Ewan (2011-06)
    • Patient safety in ambulance services: a scoping review

      Fisher, Joanne D.; Freeman, Karoline; Clarke, Aileen; Spurgeon, Peter; Smyth, Mike; Perkins, Gavin D.; Sujan, Mark-Alexander; Cooke, Matthew W. (2015-05)
    • Prehospital trauma life support

      Armitage, Ewan (2015-07)
    • A review of the annual case epidemiology and clinical exposure of 45 paramedics, in a UK ambulance service: a service evaluation

      Rosser, Andy (2020-10)
      Ambulance services are facing increased demand to provide both urgent and emergency care. Details of a paramedic’s case load, patient mix and interventions delivered during patient encounters within contemporary practice are rarely described within the literature. This paper provides insight into the work of paramedics within an NHS ambulance service within the UK; the frequency of low, medium and high acuity clinical presentations, amongst patients they care for and the utilisation of clinical interventions in practice. https://emj.bmj.com/content/37/10/e8.3 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2020-999abs.16
    • Stabilisation and transfer of sick new-borns delivered in stand-alone midwifery led units

      Tyler, W.; Philpott, A.; Brown, S.; Rhodes, J. (2014-06)
      Background Women should be offered the choice of delivering at home, in midwife-led units (MLU) or obstetric units.1 20% of Shropshire mothers choose delivery in an MLU which refer into Shrewsbury and Telford NHS Trust (SaTH) obstetric/neonatal unit for additional care. The West Midlands neonatal transfer service (WMNTS) is not commissioned to transfer babies from MLUs; any transfer required is performed by the MLU midwife and the West Midlands Ambulance Service (WMAS). These staff must be confident in recognising, stabilising and transferring babies requiring a higher level of care at or immediately after delivery. Aim To develop an educational package for midwives and paramedics caring for sick newborns. Project Representatives from midwifery, neonatal care, WMAS and WMNTS met to develop a training package. They were informed by the Scottish Transport Team who deliver a course for their remote maternity units. Support for the project was given by SaTH, WMAS and WMNTS. A one day programme was delivered at Shrewsbury MLU in December 2013. Feedback 16 midwives and 4 paramedics attended the course. All lectures, workshops and simulations were rated as good (20%) or excellent (80%). The course was rated as excellent (95%) or good (5%). Further developments Dates are set for three additional courses. All staff supporting stand-alone MLUs will access this training on a two-yearly basis. This programme will be offered to other MLUs in the West Midlands. https://fn.bmj.com/content/fetalneonatal/99/Suppl_1/A27.1.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2014-306576.75
    • Use of intranasal drug administration in the pre-hospital setting

      Creed, Chloe (2012-12)
      Abstract published with permission. This article explores the benefits of intranasal as a recommended route for drug delivery in the pre-hospital setting for healthcare professionals. It is currently used in Australia,USA and some UK Ambulance services and remains a preferred route in certain patient groups. Intranasal can lead to a reduction in needle stick injuries for the healthcare professional and allowing immediate drug therapy in a emergency setting for bystanders. Randomised control trial’s and evidencebased practice to discuss the absorption rate and different drugs that could be used through this route. After reading this article paramedics should be more aware of this safe route and its benefits in the emergency setting.