• #BlackLivesMatter (2020)

      Asamoah-Danso, Tanoh; Mistry, Alpesh (2020-07)
      ‘6 foot 9?’ Another guess going wide of the mark from our third conscious and breathing patient of the shift—a guess coming a few minutes after my sigh of relief and stand down of helimed as it had come through as a confirmed choking. The life of a black paramedic in England is slightly difficult to contextualise. It is easy to say ‘my experience is my experience only’, but more often than not, I feel my experience is probably a carbon copy of that of other black staff. https://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/full/10.12968/jpar.2020.12.7.290 Abstract published with permission.
    • History taking, assessment and documentation for paramedics

      Jenkins, Steven (2013-06)
      Abstract published with permission. Paramedic practice is progressing at a more rapid pace now than at any time in its history. Paramedics need to align their method of assessing patients to integrate into the multi-disciplinary team involved in the patient's journey of care and treatment. The review of systems (RoS) approach is widely used and accepted in healthcare, and easily assimilates into paramedic practice. RoS improves patient care by holistically assessing the patient, and can make the inter-professional handover of a patient to another team more professionally acceptable. Documentation using the RoS is more comprehensive and less prone to errors.
    • PaRAMeDIC: a randomized controlled trial of a mechanical compression device

      Smyth, Mike (2012-01)
      Abstract published with permission. Survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is influenced by the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, research shows that in the out-of-hospital environment, and particularly during ambulance transport, CPR quality is frequently sub-optimal. Mechanical compression devices can deliver high quality CPR, yet there is an absence of high quality evidence to demonstrate improved clinical or cost effectiveness outcomes. The PaRAMeDIC trial will compare manual CPR with mechanical CPR in adult patients with non-traumatic OHCA. Objectives: the primary objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of mechanical chest compressions using the LUCAS (Lund University Cardiopulmonary Assistance System)-2 on mortality at 30 days post-OHCA. Secondary objectives include survived event (return of spontaneous circulation at hospital admission), quality of life and cognitive function at 3 and 12 months, survival at 12 months and cost effectiveness. Method: the trial is a pragmatic, cluster randomized controlled trial. Ambulance vehicles are randomized to control or LUCAS arms. Patient allocation is determined by the first ambulance vehicle which arrives first on scene (manual CPR vehicle or LUCAS CPR vehicle). The trial will assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the LUCAS-2 device. Trial Registration: The trial is registered on the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Registry (ISRCTN08233942).