• Ambulance call-outs and response times in Birmingham and the impact of extreme weather and climate change

      Thornes, John Edward; Fisher, Paul Anthony; Rayment-Bishop, Tracy; Smith, Christopher (2014-03)
      Although there has been some research on the impact of extreme weather on the number of ambulance call-out incidents, especially heat waves, there has been very little research on the impact of cold weather on ambulance call-outs and response times. In the UK, there is a target response rate of 75% of life threatening incidents (Category A) that must be responded to within 8 min. This paper compares daily air temperature data with ambulance call-out data for Birmingham over a 5-year period (2007–2011). A significant relationship between extreme weather and increased ambulance callout and response times can clearly be shown. Both hot and cold weather have a negative impact on response times. During the heat wave of August 2003, the number of ambulance call-outs increased by up to a third. In December 2010 (the coldest December for more than 100 years), the response rate fell below 50% for 3 days in a row (18 December–20 December 2010) with a mean response time of 15 min. For every reduction of air temperature by 1°C there was a reduction of 1.3% in performance. Improved weather forecasting and the take up of adaptation measures, such as the use of winter tyres, are suggested for consideration as management tools to improve ambulance response resilience during extreme weather. Also it is suggested that ambulance response times could be used as part of the syndromic surveillance system at the Health Protection Agency. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/31/3/220.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2012-201817
    • The ambulance service and the child and young person’s advance care plan: listening to families and professionals

      Shaw, Karen; Spry, Jenna; Cottrell, Serena; Cummins, Carole; Fitzmaurice, Nicki; Greenfield, Sheila; Heath, Gemma; Miller, Joshua; Neilson, Sue; Skrybant, Magdelena; et al. (2020-09-25)
      The Child and Young Person’s Advance Care Plan (CYPACP) is a set of resources to help families and professionals agree a plan of care to be followed when a child/young person with a life-limiting condition develops potentially (i) reversible intercurrent illnesses or (ii) life-threatening complications of their condition. It covers clinical, psychosocial and spiritual issues, is designed for use in all environments that the child encounters, and can be used as a resuscitation and/or end-of-life plan. Little is known about the experiences of Ambulance Service staff who receive copies of these plans and may be called upon to follow the recommendations for treatment and resuscitation. https://emj.bmj.com/content/37/10/e14.1 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2020-999abs.30
    • The association between prehospital care and in-hospital treatment decisions in acute stroke: a cohort study

      Sheppard, James P.; Mellor, Ruth M.; Greenfield, Sheila; Mant, Jonathan; Quinn, Tom; Sandler, David; Sims, Don; Singh, Satinder; Ward, Matthew; McManus, Richard J.; et al. (2015-02)
      Background Hospital prealerting in acute stroke improves the timeliness of subsequent treatment, but little is known about the impact of prehospital assessments on in-hospital care. Objective Examine the association between prehospital assessments and notification by emergency medical service staff on the subsequent acute stroke care pathway. Methods This was a cohort study of linked patient medical records. Consenting patients with a diagnosis of stroke were recruited from two urban hospitals. Data from patient medical records were extracted and entered into a Cox regression analysis to investigate the association between time to CT request and recording of onset time, stroke recognition (using the Face Arm Speech Test (FAST)) and sending of a prealert message. Results 151 patients (aged 71±15 years) travelled to hospital via ambulance and were eligible for this analysis. Time of symptom onset was recorded in 61 (40%) cases, the FAST test was positive in 114 (75%) and a prealert message was sent in 65 (44%). Following adjustment for confounding, patients who had time of onset recorded (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.52 to 1.03), were FAST-positive (HR 0.54, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.80) or were prealerted (HR 0.26, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.38), were more likely to receive a timely CT request in hospital. Conclusions This study highlights the importance of hospital prealerting, accurate stroke recognition, and recording of onset time. Those not recognised with stroke in a prehospital setting appear to be excluded from the possibility of rapid treatment in hospital, even before they have been seen by a specialist. https://emj.bmj.com/content/32/2/93.long This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2013-203026
    • Clinical feedback to ambulance crews: supporting professional development

      Jenkinson, Emma; Hayman, T.; Bleetman, A. (2009-03-23)
      Ambulance crew involvement in patient care traditionally ends with handover of the patient at the emergency department (ED). We found that ambulance staff often asked informal questions about patients during subsequent visits. We therefore introduced a formal feedback service for ambulance crews in June 2005. This was initially run by a medical student, funded jointly by the trust and the West Midlands Ambulance Service. It is now run by an acute care practitioner. https://emj.bmj.com/content/26/4/309.1. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2007.053868
    • Clinical leadership in the ambulance service

      Walker, Alison; Sibson, Lynda; Marshall, Andrea (2010-06-18)
      Ambulance Services in England have recently launched the Report of the National Steering Group on Clinical Leadership in the Ambulance Service. This is the first document specifically reviewing the roles and development of Clinical Leadership, at all levels, for UK ambulance service clinicians. The document covers an evidence-based review of clinical leadership principles outlined in key policy documents, publications and systems; a strategic framework for clinical leadership in ambulance service; and includes examples of good current practice in ambulance service clinical leadership and development Clinical leadership has been referred to in a number of key policy documents; most notably, Taking Healthcare to the Patient: Transforming NHS Ambulance Services (DH 2005) made a number of recommendations of which Recommendation 62 is the most relevant to this document. “There should be improved opportunity for career progression, with scope for ambulance professionals to become clinical leaders. While ambulance trusts will always need clinical direction from a variety of specialties, they should develop the potential of their own staff to influence clinical developments and improve and assure quality of care.” This report focuses on putting theory into practice, a proposed clinical leadership ladder and a clinical leadership self-assessment tool for individuals and organisations. Some clinical leadership examples are also included. The completed report was formally launched at the Ambulance Leadership Forum (English ambulance services, with participation for Clinical Leadership from the other UK ambulance services) in April 2009 and will pave the way for the development of the Ambulance Service National Future Clinical Leaders Group. This national pilot, involving all the UK NHS ambulance services, will comprise of staff with paramedic backgrounds who will receive leadership development to work with the CEOs and Directors of Clinical Care groups to progress clinical quality and clinical leadership development in the ambulance service. https://emj.bmj.com/content/27/6/490.2. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2009.078915
    • Did West Midlands ambulance service paramedics’ usage of adrenaline change after the publication of the paramedic2 results, but prior to any guideline change? A service evaluation

      Gunson, Imogen M. (2020-10)
      This project evaluated whether practice change occurred amongst Paramedics directly after the publication of the PARAMEDIC2 trial, regarding adrenaline administration during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) without a change in guidelines. When Paramedics are exposed to a seminal publication there is anecdotal concern their autonomous practice changes, based on comprehension of findings ahead of potential guideline changes, however little evidence appraises whether this really occurs. https://emj.bmj.com/content/37/10/e4.3 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2020-999abs.7
    • Evolution of triage systems

      Robertson-Steel, Iain (2006-01-26)
      The French word "trier", the origin of the word "triage", was originally applied to a process of sorting, probably around 1792, by Baron Dominique Jean Larrey, Surgeon in Chief to Napoleon's Imperial Guard. Larrey was credited with designing a flying ambulance: the Ambulance Volante. Baron Francois Percy also contributed to the organisation of a care system for the ongoing management of casualties. Out of the French Service de Santé, not only emerged the concept of triage, but the organisational structure necessary to handle the growing number of casualties in modern warfare. http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2005.030270 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/openhrt-2015-000281
    • Haemorrhage from femoral vein cannula: an additional potential source of haemorrhage among intravenous drug users

      Cooke, R.; Fitzpatrick, J. (2009-08-21)
      Use of the femoral vein for self-administration of drugs is increasing among intravenous drug users. We report an unusual source of haemorrhage in an habitual intravenous drug user involved in trauma. https://emj.bmj.com/content/26/9/675. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2008.071175
    • ‘Have you had the surgery?’: A survey of transgender and non-binary patients’ experiences of interacting with the ambulance service

      Barley, Chloé; Tooms, Alec (2019-09-24)
      Background Pre-hospital research around the experience of transgender and non-binary (TNB) patients is scarce, with existing articles lacking input from TNB patients. This research aimed to collate TNB patients’ experiences of interacting with the ambulance service. A secondary aim was to gather TNB patients’ opinions regarding the education of ambulance clinicians on TNB health issues. Method An online-based, mixed-methods survey was created. A range of free text, multiple choice and Likert-scaled questions were used. Advertisement on social media was tailored to target TNB individuals who have had patient contact with the ambulance service. All respondents were anonymous and voluntary. This survey was conducted by TNB individuals in a personal capacity, without funding. Results 72% of the 25 respondents rated their experience as satisfactory or above. 40% reported that identifying as TNB affected the way they were treated and 40% reported that they were asked about their gender by the ambulance crew. In free text answers, the main themes identified were the misidentification of gender, the use of incorrect pronouns, hospital handovers, intrusive/irrelevant questioning and the need for training. Conclusions The responses suggest that TNB patients feel that being asked about their gender is important however ambulance staff sometimes struggled to address this sensitively. Positive experiences included having gender and pronouns addressed in hospital handover which can form a recommendation for best practice. Negative experiences were associated with being misgendered, using incorrect pronouns and intrusive/irrelevant questioning. Survey responses led to practical recommendations for ambulance staff interacting with TNB patients, including the authors creating a training session which has received positive feedback from clinicians. Limitations include small sample size, potential for response bias due to survey being self-selecting and missing demographic data. Recommendations for further research are to provide a more in-depth exploration of TNB experience and of ambulance staff views., https://emj.bmj.com/content/36/10/e2.2. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2019-999abs.2
    • ‘I wish there was CPAP in every box’: internet-based survey responses of clinicians recruiting to a pilot randomised controlled trial of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for patients with acute respiratory failure

      Miller, Joshua; Keating, Samuel; Fuller, Gordon W.; Goodacre, Steve (2019-09-24)
      Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is not in widespread use in UK ambulance services, but could benefit patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). As a new treatment in this context, clinician acceptability is an important factor in the feasibility of conducting definitive research in the prehospital arena. Methods As part of a pilot randomised controlled trial (the ACUTE study), recruiting clinicians were emailed after enrolling patients to either the CPAP or standard-care arm, and were asked to complete an optional, anonymous, internet-based survey. The survey used a mixture of closed questions, Likert-scaled answers and free text to explore staff views on both the treatment and the trial procedures. Quantitative responses were analysed descriptively, and qualitative answers thematically. Results Recruiting clinicians for all 77 patients were sent survey links, with 40 email responses received. Respondents felt confident diagnosing ARF and determining trial eligibility. CPAP-arm respondents found the equipment easy-to-use and felt it did not delay transport to hospital. Most standard-care respondents said they would have liked CPAP to be available to their patients. Respondents described varying responses from receiving hospital staff. Conclusions Prehospital CPAP seems acceptable to clinicians. Limitations of this survey are that it was targeted only at clinicians who have already opted to take part in the trial, and so may exclude a body of staff who find the treatment unacceptable at face value. Not all clinicians who enrolled patients completed the survey, which could suggest a response bias or simply a reflection of its optional nature within the trial. Future pilot studies could mandate an acceptability survey, and also seek the views of staff not taking part in the interventional study. Trial teams may need to better explain the rationale of comparing a new intervention with standard care, and offer more widespread hospital staff awareness sessions., https://emj.bmj.com/content/36/10/e11.2 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2019-999abs.25
    • Impact of introducing a major trauma network on a regional helicopter emergency medicine service in the UK

      McQueen, Carl; Crombie, Nicholas; Perkins, Gavin D.; Wheaton, Steve (2014-10)
      Introduction In the West Midlands region of the UK, the delivery of prehospital trauma care has recently been remodelled through the introduction of a regionalised major trauma network (MTN). Helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) are integral to the network, providing means of delivering highly skilled specialist teams to scenes of trauma and rapid transfer of patients to major trauma centres. This study reviews the impact of introducing the West Midlands MTN on the operation of one its regional HEMS units. Methods Retrospective review of the Midlands Air Ambulance clinical database for the 6 months after the launch of the West Midlands MTN. The corresponding period for the previous year was reviewed for comparison. The contribution of trauma cases to overall workload, mission outcome data and the number of interventions performed at the scene were compared. Results The proportion of HEMS activations for trauma cases was similar in both cohorts (70.84% before MTN vs 71.57% after MTN). The proportion of mission cancellations was significantly lower after the launch of the network (23.71% vs 19.03%). Significantly more scene attendances resulted in interventions by HEMS crews after the MTN launch (44.66% vs 56.92%). Conclusions Since the introduction of the West Midlands MTN, tasking of HEMS assets appears to be better targeted to cases involving significant injury, and a reduction in mission cancellations has been observed. There is a need for more detailed evaluation of patient outcomes to identify strategies for optimising the utilisation of HEMS assets within the regional network. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/31/10/844.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2013-202756
    • Incidence of acute respiratory failure cases in West Midlands Ambulance Service (WMAS) – sub-study of ACUTE (ambulance CPAP: use, treatment effect and economics) trial

      Gunson, Imogen M.; Herbert, Esther; Fuller, Gordon W. (2019-09-24)
      Background Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a life-threatening emergency and pre-hospital CPAP may improve outcomes. A CPAP cost-effectiveness determinant is the incidence of eligible patients with ARF. This sub-study of the ACUTE trial aimed to determine the number of adults with ARF potentially suitable for CPAP, presenting to WMAS. Methods This observational study was conducted between 1stAugust 2017 and 31st July 2018. Adult patients presenting with SpO2 <94% were identified from WMAS electronic patient records. Electronic filters applied ACUTE trial inclusion and exclusion criteria, with subsequent manual clinical review by a research paramedic. A second research paramedic checked a sub-sample for inter-rater agreement. Overall and monthly incidence rates were calculated, census data provided the population denominator. Results 108,391 potential patients were identified from electronic patient records (EPR), after filter application 4,526 cases were eligible for review (Figure 1). After review, 1017 cases were considered CPAP candidates. Inter-rater agreement was 86%. Overall incidence was 17.35 per 100,000 population per year (95%CI 16.3–18.5). Marked seasonal variation was present, increasing over winter (Figure 2). Urban areas had the highest proportion of eligible patients (67.6% v 18.3% Rural v 14.2% semi-rural); and 53.0% of all eligible were male. Conclusions The incidence of eligible ARF patients impacts on the cost-effectiveness of pre-hospital CPAP, but previous reports have been variable, using sub-optimal methods or from non-UK settings. We report a valid NHS estimate of 17 patients per 100,000 who do not respond to current pre-hospital ARF management and could be candidates for CPAP., https://emj.bmj.com/content/36/10/e11.3. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2019-999abs.26
    • ‘Interception’: a model for specialist prehospital care provision when helicopters are not available

      McQueen, Carl; Apps, Richard; Mason, Fay; Crombie, Nicholas; Hulme, Jon (2013-11)
      The deployment of specialist teams to incident scenes by helicopter and the delivery of critical care interventions such as Rapid Sequence Induction of anaesthesia to patients are becoming well-established components of trauma care in the UK. Traditionally in the UK, Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) are limited to daylight operations only. The safety and feasibility of operating HEMS services at night is a topic of debate currently in the UK HEMS community. Within the West Midlands Major Trauma Network, the Medical Emergency Response Incident Team (MERIT) provides a physician-led prehospital care service that responds to incidents by air during daylight hours and by Rapid Response Vehicle during the hours of darkness. The MERIT service is coordinated and supported by a dedicated Major Trauma Desk manned by a HEMS paramedic in the ambulance service control room. This case illustrates the importance of coordination and integration of specialist resources within a major trauma network to ensure the expedient delivery of HEMS-level care to patients outside of normal flying hours. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/30/11/956.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2013-202989
    • Keeping the beat: does music improve the performance of chest compression by lay persons?

      Rawlins, Lettie; Woollard, Malcolm; Hallam, Phil; Williams, Julia (2011-03)
      Background Early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) increases survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Simplifying training can improve skill retention and confidence. A recent pilot study suggested music may help health professionals perform CPR. The song ‘Nellie the Elephant’ (tempo 100 bpm) is sometimes used to encourage compression rates in accordance with Resuscitation Council guidelines. This study investigates whether music helps lay persons perform compressions at 100 per minute. Methods This randomised cross-over trial opportunistically recruited lay volunteers who performed three sequences, pre-randomised for order, of one minute of continuous chest compressions on a recording manikin accompanied by no music (NM) and repeated choruses of ‘Nellie the Elephant’ (Nellie), and ‘That's The Way (I Like It)' (TTW). Results Of 130 participants, 62% were male, median age was 21 (IQR 20 to 25), 72% had no previous CPR training. Mode and IQR for compression rate were NM 111 (93 to 119); Nellie 106 (98 to 107), (TTW) 109 (103 to 110). Within-groups differences were significant for Nellie vs NM and Nellie vs TTW (p<0.001) but not NM vs TTW (p=0.055). A compression rate of 95 to 105 was achieved with NM, Nellie, and TTW for 15/130 (12%), 42/130 (32%) and 12/130 (9%) attempts respectively. Differences in proportions were significant for Nellie vs. NM and Nellie vs TTW (p<0.0001) but not for NM vs TTW (p=0.55). Relative ‘risk’ for compression rate between 95 and 105 was 2.8 for Nellie vs NM (95%CI 1.66 to 4.80), 0.8 for TTW vs NM (95% CI 0.40 to 1.62), and 3.5 for Nellie vs. TTW (95% CI 1.97 to 6.33). Conclusion and recommendations ‘Listening to Nellie’ (vs TTW or no music) significantly increased the proportion of lay persons achieving compression rates close to the 100 bpm guideline. Playing it during training and ‘real’ CPR may help rescuers deliver correct compression rates. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/28/3/e1.18.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2010.108605.6
    • Prehospital anaesthesia performed by physician/critical care paramedic teams in a major trauma network in the UK: a 12 month review of practice

      McQueen, Carl; Crombie, Nicholas; Hulme, Jonathan; Cormack, Stef; Hussain, Nageena; Ludwig, Frank; Wheaton, Steve (2015-01)
      Introduction In the West Midlands region of the UK, delivery of pre-hospital care has been remodelled through introduction of a 24 h Medical Emergency Response Incident Team (MERIT). Teams including physicians and critical care paramedics (CCP) are deployed to incidents on land-based and helicopter-based platforms. Clinical practice, including delivery of rapid sequence induction of anaesthesia (RSI), is underpinned by standard operating procedures (SOP). This study describes the first 12 months experience of prehospital RSI in the MERIT scheme in the West Midlands. Methods Retrospective review of the MERIT clinical database for the 12 months following the launch of the scheme. Data was collected relating to the number of RSIs performed; indication for RSI; number of intubation attempts; grade of view on laryngoscopy and the base speciality/grade of the operator performing intubation. Results MERIT teams were activated 1619 times, attending scene in 1029 cases. RSI was performed 142 times (13.80% of scene attendances). There was one recorded case of failure to intubate requiring insertion of a supraglottic airway device (0.70%). In over a third of RSI cases, CCPs performed laryngoscopy and intubation (n=53, 37.32%). Proficiency of obtaining Grade I view at laryngoscopy was similar for physicians (74.70%) and CCPs (77.36%). Intubation was successful at the first attempt in over 90% of cases. Conclusions This study demonstrates that operation within a system that provides high levels of exposure, underpinned by comprehensive and robust training and governance frameworks, promotes levels of performance in successful prehospital RSI regardless of base speciality or profession. https://emj.bmj.com/content/32/1/65.long This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2013-202890
    • Prehospital reflections: diagnosing apnoea at a multiple casualty chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear incident

      Malpas, Michael (2011-12)
      During a multiple casualty chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear incident it is imperative that triage is accurately undertaken to use resources effectively and give the greatest chance of survival to those who need it. This reflection explores an option to assist in this matter by proposing a colorimetric breathing detection system, while remembering that this it is untested, may be a useful aid. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/28/12/1061.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2011.113019
    • Prevalence and predictors of hospital prealerting in acute stroke: a mixed methods study

      Sheppard, James P.; Lindenmeyer, A.; Mellor, Ruth M.; Greenfield, Sheila; Mant, Jonathan; Quinn, Tom; Rosser, Andrew; Sandler, David; Sims, D.; Ward, Matthew; et al. (2016-07)
      Background Thrombolysis can significantly reduce the burden of stroke but the time window for safe and effective treatment is short. In patients travelling to hospital via ambulance, the sending of a ‘prealert’ message can significantly improve the timeliness of treatment. Objective Examine the prevalence of hospital prealerting, the extent to which prealert protocols are followed and what factors influence emergency medical services (EMS) staff’s decision to send a prealert. Methods Cohort study of patients admitted to two acute stroke units in West Midlands (UK) hospitals using linked data from hospital and EMS records. A logistic regression model examined the association between prealert eligibility and whether a prealert message was sent. In semistructured interviews, EMS staff were asked about their experiences of patients with suspected stroke. Results Of the 539 patients eligible for this study, 271 (51%) were recruited. Of these, only 79 (29%) were eligible for prealerting according to criteria set out in local protocols but 143 (53%) were prealerted. Increasing number of Face, Arm, Speech Test symptoms (1 symptom, OR 6.14, 95% CI 2.06 to 18.30, p=0.001; 2 symptoms, OR 31.36, 95% CI 9.91 to 99.24, p<0.001; 3 symptoms, OR 75.84, 95% CI 24.68 to 233.03, p<0.001) and EMS contact within 5 h of symptom onset (OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.37 to 6.50 p=0.006) were key predictors of prealerting but eligibility for prealert as a whole was not (OR 1.92, 95% CI 0.85 to 4.34 p=0.12). In qualitative interviews, EMS staff displayed varying understanding of prealert protocols and described frustration when their interpretation of the prealert criteria was not shared by ED staff. Conclusions Up to half of the patients presenting with suspected stroke in this study were prealerted by EMS staff, regardless of eligibility, resulting in disagreements with ED staff during handover. Aligning the expectations of EMS and ED staff, perhaps through simplified prealert protocols, could be considered to facilitate more appropriate use of hospital prealerting in acute stroke. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/33/7/482.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2014-204392
    • A review of the annual case epidemiology and clinical exposure of 45 paramedics, in a UK ambulance service: a service evaluation

      Rosser, Andy (2020-10)
      Ambulance services are facing increased demand to provide both urgent and emergency care. Details of a paramedic’s case load, patient mix and interventions delivered during patient encounters within contemporary practice are rarely described within the literature. This paper provides insight into the work of paramedics within an NHS ambulance service within the UK; the frequency of low, medium and high acuity clinical presentations, amongst patients they care for and the utilisation of clinical interventions in practice. https://emj.bmj.com/content/37/10/e8.3 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2020-999abs.16
    • ‘They are not silly people – they know the difference’: clinician focus group views on a pilot randomised controlled trial of prehospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)

      Miller, Joshua; Keating, Samuel; Scott, Alex; Fuller, Gordon W.; Goodacre, Steve (2019-09-24)
      Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is not in widespread use in UK ambulance services, but could benefit patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). As a new treatment in this context, clinician acceptability is an important factor in the feasibility of conducting definitive research in the prehospital arena. Methods As part of a pilot randomised controlled trial (the ACUTE study), nine trial-trained paramedics took part in three semi-structured focus groups. 204 trained staff had been given the opportunity to take part. The sample included six staff who had recruited to the trial, one who had not, and two who had withdrawn from it. Audio-recordings were transcribed and analysed thematically. Results Participants described facilitators to trial participation including: clear eligibility criteria and patient documentation, access to demonstration equipment, training away from the work environment, and repeated patient recruitment. Barriers to taking part included: the lack of protected time for training, inadequate workplace facilities for the electronic learning package used, adverse responses by receiving hospital staff, and infrequent patient exposure. Both paramedics who withdrew cited the inconvenience of carrying packs each shift. Some participants described anxiety and distress when opening packs to find a standard-care mask, and reported patients having similar reactions. Conclusions Future researchers could promote improved workplace computing facilities and increased provision of face-to-face training days, which were praised by participants in these focus groups, but limited to a single event distant from some staff. Greater stakeholder engagement by researchers could reduce the difficulties at hospital handover reported by some ambulance staff. Where blinding is not possible, the perceptions of clinicians and patients should be considered carefully, as this study shows both may have adverse emotional responses to being treated with standard care, particularly when prospective consent discussions describe the trial intervention as potentially beneficial., https://emj.bmj.com/content/36/10/e12.2 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2019-999abs.28