• Acute stroke life support: a United States based training course; is it appropriate for and transferable to the English health care setting?

      Davis, David; Crook, D.; Hargroves, D.; Miller, G.; South, A.; Jenkinson, D.; Smithard, D. (2009-12-01)
    • ECPs: avoiding emergency department attendance or hospital admission?

      Coates, David (2010-04)
      The aim of the literature review was to identify and appraise studies that have compared the effectiveness and decision-making of emergency care practitioners with other health professionals. There is no ‘gold standard’ for determining whether the actions of an emergency care practitioner (ECP) results in a patient avoiding attendance at an emergency department (ED) or hospital admission. Consequently, reporting on the cost effectiveness of ECPs is potentially spurious, especially as the cost difference between ED attendance and hospital admission is considerable. Medline and EMBASE databases were searched for publications relevant to the study area. Additional searches were carried out using the online search function offered by the Cochrane Library and the Emergency Medicine Journal. Twenty-nine publications met the inclusion criteria. Nineteen of these papers were considered suitable for background information only. Ten studies were analyzed in further detail and three main themes identified: non-conveyance rates, decision-making and admission avoidance. Studies show that patients assessed by ECPs are less likely to be conveyed to the ED, than when attended by a traditional ambulance response. The Department of Health (DH, 2005) refer to a traditional ambulance service response to a 999 call as sending a double-crewed paramedic ambulance to the patient, provide any necessary life support to stabilize the patient and transport to the ED. The decision-making of ECPs compares favourably with other health professionals when deciding whether a patient can be treated at home, or requires ED attendance or hospital admission. No studies were found that determined whether an ECP is able to accurately decide whether their intervention results in patients avoiding ED attendance or admission. There is a need to evaluate the validity of data collection methods which differentiate between emergency department and admission avoidance as a result of the actions of ECPs. Abstract published with permission.
    • Development and pilot of clinical performance indicators for English ambulance services

      Siriwardena, Aloysius; Shaw, Deborah; Donohoe, Rachel; Black, Sarah; Stephenson, John; National Ambulance Clinical Audit Steering Group (2010-04-12)
      Introduction There is a compelling need to develop clinical performance indicators for ambulance services in order to move from indicators based primarily on response times and in light of the changing clinical demands on services. We report on progress on the national pilot of clinical performance indicators for English ambulance services. Method Clinical performance indicators were developed in five clinical areas: acute myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest, stroke (including transient ischaemic attack), asthma and hypoglycaemia. These were determined on the basis of common acute conditions presenting to ambulance services and in line with a previously published framework. Indicators were piloted by ambulance services in England and results were presented in tables and graphically using funnel (statistical process control) plots. Results Progress for developing, agreeing and piloting of indicators has been rapid, from initial agreement in May 2007 to completion of the pilot phase by the end of March 2008. The results of benchmarking of indicators are shown. The pilot has informed services in deciding the focus of their improvement programme in 2008–2009 and indicators have been adopted for national performance assessment of standards of prehospital care. Conclusion The pilot will provide the basis for further development of clinical indicators, benchmarking of performance and implementation of specific evidence-based interventions to improve care in areas identified for improvement. A national performance improvement registry will enable evaluation and sharing of effective improvement methods as well as increasing stakeholder and public access to information on the quality of care provided by ambulance services. https://emj.bmj.com/content/27/4/327. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2009.072397
    • They think it's all over - managing post cardiac arrest syndrome

      Page, Michael (2012-04-06)
      Abstract published with permission. Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) is the first stage in the successful management of the cardiac arrest patient. The care that the patient receives during the immediate post-ROSC period, has a major impact on subsequent survival from out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), particularly in terms of surviving to hospital discharge neurologically intact. For the first time, the 2010 Resuscitation Council (UK) (Nolan, 2010) guidelines incorporates a section specifically relating to the mangement of OHCA. This review will outline the guidance from the Resuscitation Council (UK) and the International Liaison Committee On Resuscitation (ILCOR) on the management of post cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS) and how this can be practically implemented in the pre-hospital environment. interventions directly applicable to the pre-hospital phase until handover at the emergency department (ED) will be considered. In addition, specific guidance relating to the management of the ROSC patient in the pre-hospital phase of their care will be provided.
    • Reducing thrombolysis call to needle times - preliminary results from the Stroke90 project

      Kendall, J.M.; Dutta, D.; Brown, E.A.M.; Caine, S.E.; Whiting, R.; Bosnell, R.; Shaw, L.J.; Black, T.; Rashed, K.A.; Aujla, K.S.; et al. (2013-05)
    • Research developments within the Allied Health Professions Research Network (AHPRN)

      Williams, Julia; Robinson, Maria; McClelland, Graham (2014-01)
    • Psychological wellbeing following cardiac arrest and its relationship to neurocognitive function

      Davies, S.; Rhys, M.; Voss, Sarah; Greenwood, R.; Thomas, M.; Benger, Jonathan R. (2014-01)
    • An exploration of the views of paramedics regarding airway and resuscitation research

      Brandling, Janet; Rhys, Megan; Thomas, Matthew J.C.; Voss, Sarah; Davies, S.; Benger, Jonathan R. (2014-01)
    • Rates of organ donation in a UK tertiary cardiac arrest centre following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

      Cheetham, Olivia V.; Thomas, Matthew J.C.; Hadfield, John; O'Higgins, Fran; Mitchell, Claire; Rooney, Kieron D. (2016-04)
    • A survey of paramedic advanced airway practice in the UK

      Younger, Paul; Pilbery, Richard; Lethbridge, Kris (2016-12)
      Abstract published with permission. Introduction ‐ Although there are published studies examining UK paramedic airway management in the out-of-hospital setting, there has been no sizeable survey of practicing UK paramedics that examines their advanced airway management practice, training and confidence. Therefore, the Airway Management Group of the College of Paramedics commissioned a survey to gain an up to date snapshot of advanced airway management practice across the UK among paramedics. Methods ‐ An online questionnaire was created, and a convenience sample of Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) registered paramedics was invited to participate in the survey. Invitations were made using the College of Paramedics e-mail mailing list, the College website, as well as social media services such as Twitter and Facebook. The survey ran online for 28 days from 21 October to 18 November 2014 to allow as many paramedics to participate as possible. The survey questions considered a range of topics including which supraglottic airway devices are most commonly available in practice and whether or not tracheal intubation also formed a part of individual skillsets. In relation to intubation, respondents were asked a range of questions including which education programmes had been used for original skill acquisition, how skills were maintained, what techniques and equipment were available for intubation attempts, individual practitioner confidence in intubation and how intubation attempts were documented. Results ‐ A total of 1658 responses to the survey were received. Following data cleansing, 152 respondents were removed from the survey, leaving a total of 1506. This represented 7.3% of paramedics registered with the HCPC (20,565) at the time the survey was conducted. The majority of respondents were employed within NHS ambulance services. Summary ‐ This is the largest survey of UK paramedics conducted to date, in relation to advanced airway management. It provides an overview of advanced airway management, with a particular focus on intubation, being conducted by UK paramedics.
    • Variation in ambulance call rates for care homes in Torbay, UK

      Hancock, Jason; Matthews, Justin; Ukoumunne, Obioha C.; Lang, Iain; Somerfield, David; Wenman, James; Dickens, Chris (2017-05)
    • Identification of characteristics of neighbourhoods with high incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and low bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation rates

      Brown, Terry P.; Hawkes, Claire A.; Booth, Scott J.; Fothergill, Rachael T.; Black, Sara; Bichmann, Anna; Pocock, Helen; Soar, Jasmeet; Mark, Julian; Benger, Jonathan R.; et al. (2017-09)
    • Improving data quality in a UK out-of-hospital cardiac arrest registry through data linkage between the Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Outcomes (OHCAO) project and NHS Digital

      Rajagopal, Sangeerthana; Booth, Scott J.; Brown, Terry P.; Ji, Chen; Hawkes, Claire A.; Siriwardena, A. Niroshan; Kirby, Kim; Black, Sarah; Spaight, Robert; Gunson, Imogen; et al. (2017-09)