Now showing items 1-20 of 102

    • Hub-and-spoke model for thrombectomy service in UK NHS practice

      Zhang, Liqun; Ogunbemi, Ayokunle; Trippier, Sarah; Clarke, Brian; Khan, Usman; Hall, Claire; Ji, Qiuhong; Clifton, Andrew; Cluckie, Gillian (2021-01)
    • Basics in advanced life support: A role for download audit and metronomes

      Fletcher, David; Galloway, Robert; Chamberlain, Douglas; Pateman, Jane; Bryant, Geoffrey; Newcombe, Robert G. (2008-08-01)
    • Student paramedic decision-making: a critical exploration of a patient interaction

      Costello, Barry; Downs, Simon (2021-02)
      Clinical decision-making is a multifaceted construct, requiring the practitioner to gather, interpret and evaluate data to select and implement an evidence-based choice of action. Clinical reasoning is a difficult skill for students to develop due in part to the inability to guarantee awareness or opportunity to develop within time spent in practice. While professional developments within the past few years have established a supportive preceptorship programme within NHS trusts for new paramedic registrants, enhancing activities to develop these crucial skills within a pre-registrant programme should be prioritised to enhance the abilities of students and subsequent new registrants. A better understanding of the reasoning processes used during clinical decision-making may help health professionals with less experience to develop their processes in their own clinical reasoning. To embed such awareness and enhanced practice, the lead author, a third-year student paramedic at the time of writing, presents a reflective consideration of a patient encounter using the hypothetico-deductive model to evaluate and critically explore his own reasoning and processing within a meaningful patient interaction. Abstract published with permission.
    • Does a paramedic practitioner self-tasking dispatch model benefit their self-sufficiency in patient management? A cross sectional study

      Cotterill, Liam; Halter, Mary (2020-10)
      Paramedic Practitioner (PP) scope of practice is not comprehensively understood by Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) staff and tasking may be suboptimal. In one UK ambulance trust in November 2018, one PP team was enabled to remotely monitor live incidents and, alongside some continued EOC-dispatch, to self-task to incidents they judged would benefit from their additional knowledge and skills. Evidence on self-tasking benefit was found from helicopter emergency services only. https://emj.bmj.com/content/37/10/e11.2 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2020-999abs.24
    • Impact of videolaryngoscopy introduction into prehospital emergency medicine practice: a quality improvement project.

      Steel, Alistair; Haldane, Charlotte; Cody, Dan (2021-02-15)
      Advanced airway management is necessary in the prehospital environment and difficult airways occur more commonly in this setting. Failed intubation is closely associated with the most devastating complications of airway management. In an attempt to improve the safety and success of tracheal intubation, we implemented videolaryngoscopy (VL) as our first-line device for tracheal intubation within a UK prehospital emergency medicine (PHEM) setting. https://emj.bmj.com/content/early/2021/02/14/emermed-2020-209944 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2020-209944
    • A national survey of ambulance paramedics on the identification of patients with end of life care needs

      Eaton-Williams, Peter; Barrett, Jack; Mortimer, Craig; Williams, Julia (2020-12-01)
      Objectives: Developing the proactive identification of patients with end of life care (EoLC) needs within ambulance paramedic clinical practice may improve access to care for patients not benefitting from EoLC services at present. To inform development of this role, this study aims to assess whether ambulance paramedics currently identify EoLC patients, are aware of identification guidance and believe this role is appropriate for their practice. Methods: Between 4 November 2019 and 5 January 2020, registered paramedics from nine English NHS ambulance service trusts were invited to complete an online questionnaire. The questionnaire initially explored current practice and awareness, employing multiple-choice questions. The Gold Standards Framework Proactive Identification Guidance (GSF PIG) was then presented as an example of EoLC assessment guidance, and further questions, permitting freetext responses, explored attitudes towards performing this role. Results: 1643 questionnaires were analysed. Most participants (79.9%; n = 1313) perceived that they attended a patient who was unrecognised as within the last year of life on at least a monthly basis. Despite 72.0% (n = 1183) of paramedics indicating that they had previously made an EoLC referral to a General Practitioner, only 30.5% (n = 501) were familiar with the GSF PIG and of those only 25.9% (n = 130) had received training in its use. Participants overwhelmingly believed that they could (94.4%; n = 1551) and should (97.0%; n = 1594) perform this role, yet current barriers were identified as the inaccessibility of a patient’s medical records, inadequate EoLC education and communication difficulties. Consequently, facilitators to performing this role were identified as the provision of training in EoLC assessment guidance and establishing accessible, responsive EoLC referral pathways. Abstract published with permission.
    • A retrospective review of patients with significant traumatic brain injury transported by emergency medical services within the south east of England

      Barrett, Jack (2019-03)
      Traumatic brain injury (TBI) will be a leading cause of death and disability within the Western world by 2020. Currently, 80% of all TBI patients in England are transported to hospital by an ambulance service. The aim of this retrospective study is to compare TBI patients transported to a major trauma centre (MTC) against those transported to a trauma unit (TU). Abstract published with permission.
    • Ambulance clinicians’ perspectives of sharing patient information electronically

      Barrett, Jack (2019-12)
      Communication in the NHS is vital to patient care and safety. Government bodies are pushing for the digitisation of patient health records so that access and transfer of information is easier between patient care teams. Many ambulance trusts have issued their clinical staff tablet computers as a step in the transition from paper-based to electronic-based patient health records. This study aims to evaluate whether these ambulance clinicians perceive tangible benefits to digitisation, particularly regarding collaborative working with other healthcare professionals. Abstract published with permission.
    • Where's the Fire?

      Copson, Anne (2008-12)
      As the UK explores the potential for fire services to act as first-responders to medical incidents, it is interesting that this research focuses on a system where fire services have traditionally been utilized as first-responders and where questions are now being asked as to whether this resource is appropriate for all emergency health care calls. The study included a ‘before-after’ design and set out to examine whether a selective emergency medical dispatch (EMD) system could reduce the frequency of deployment of fire department first-responder units and, if it did, whether this compromised patient safety. Abstract published with permission.
    • Paramedic management of shock in trauma: unlocking the potential

      Hitt, Andy (2010-08)
      Globally, traumatic injury is a leading cause of death for patients under 45 years old. A consequence of serious or poorly managed trauma is shock—a clinical syndrome that is both preventable and treatable if spotted in time. Heightened pathophysiological awareness and a review of diagnostic methods may promote early circulatory support rather than aggressive resuscitation. This could reduce the risk of iatrogenic complications and avoid unnecessary delay. The aim of this article is to critically appraise the treatment options currently available to UK paramedics and postulate realistic improvements based on underlying pathophysiology. Abstract published with permission.
    • Acute stroke life support: a United States based training course; is it appropriate for and transferable to the English health care setting?

      Davis, David; Crook, D.; Hargroves, D.; Miller, G.; South, A.; Jenkinson, D.; Smithard, D. (2009-12-01)
    • A Study to Assess the Use of Pre-Hospital Charcoal in South East England

      Dines, A. M.; Butler, C.; Taylor, I.; Ovaska, H.; Rowland, A.; Wood, D. M.; Dargan, Prinkeet (2009-06-03)
    • Vehicles and equipment for land-based neonatal transport

      Kempley, S. T.; Ratnavel, Nandiran; Fellows, T. (2009-08)
    • Phase shift in transmitted electrocardiograms: A cautionary tale of distorted signals

      Tayler, David; Hitt, Andy; Jolley, Brian; Sanders, Guy; Chamberlain, Douglas (2009-08-01)
    • Rudolf Juchems — A pioneer of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Germany

      Böttiger, Bernd W.; Chamberlain, Douglas A.; Bossaert, Leo; Juchems, Markus (2009-10)
    • The primacy of basics in advanced life support

      Chamberlain, Douglas; Frenneaux, Michael; Fletcher, David (2009-06)
    • Prehospital neuromuscular blockade post OHCA: UK's first paramedic-delivered protocol

      Durham, Mark; Westhead, Pete; Griffiths, David; Lyon, Richard; Lau-Walker, Margaret (2020-05-05)
      Background: Since 2016, critical care paramedics from the South East Coast Ambulance Service have offered neuromuscular blockade to patients for ventilatory/airway control after cardiac arrest. Aims: To examine the first cases of paramedic-delivered neuromuscular blockade, and evaluate the prevalence of its use and safety. Methods: Retrospective service evaluation of patients receiving post-arrest paralysis during the study period from 1 April 2016 until 31 July 2017. Findings: The study included 127 patients. The mean age of administration was 63 years, mean weight was 80 kg (SD: 19 kg), dose was 1 mg/kg and median time from rocuronium administration to hospital was 32 minutes (IQR 20–43 minutes). Three patients (2.3%) experienced a minor adverse incident. There were no major airway complications, nor other significant adverse incidents. Thirty-seven patients (31%) survived to discharge. Conclusion: From this patient group, paramedic-administered rocuronium in intubated patients who have experienced a cardiac arrest and a return of spontaneous circulation appears to be safe, but further interventional research is required to determine whether this improves patient outcomes. Abstract published with permission.
    • Patient assessment: a reflective case study

      Hitt, Andy (2009-12-18)
      The three ‘C's of physical assessment—capacity, consent and communication—could be compared to the ‘ABCs' of resuscitation; without all three you will make very little, if any, progress. But do we give these aspects the attention they deserve, especially in time critical situations? This case study is based on a 76-year-old female who presented at Accident and Emergency (A&E) with central chest pain, diarrhoea and vomiting, productive cough and pyrexia. The aims of this case study are to discuss the impact of 21st century legislation on patient assessment, demonstrate the importance of objective, structured history taken and investigate the subjective nature of physical examination. In a world of waiting lists and litigation some argue that we should let technology do the leg work—ultrasound, chest x-rays, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT)—why use a stethoscope? Abstract published with permission.
    • Exploring paramedic perceptions of feedback using a phenomenological approach

      Eaton-Williams, Peter; Mold, Freda; Magnusson, Carin (2020-06-01)
      Abstract published with permission. Objectives: Despite widespread advocacy of a feedback culture in healthcare, paramedics receive little feedback on their clinical performance. Provision of ‘outcome feedback’, or information concerning health-related patient outcomes following incidents that paramedics have attended, is proposed, to provide paramedics with a means of assessing and developing their diagnostic and decision-making skills. To inform the design of feedback mechanisms, this study aimed to explore the perceptions of paramedics concerning current feedback provision and to discover their attitudes towards formal provision of patient outcome feedback. Methods: Convenience sampling from a single ambulance station in the United Kingdom (UK) resulted in eight paramedics participating in semi-structured interviews. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was employed to generate descriptive and interpretative themes related to both current and potential feedback provision. Results: The perception that only exceptional incidents initiate feedback, and that often the required depth of information supplied is lacking, resulted in some participants describing an isolation of their daily practice. Barriers and limitations of the informal processes currently employed to access feedback were also highlighted. Formal provision of outcome feedback was anticipated by participants to benefit the integration and progression of the paramedic profession as a whole, in addition to facilitating the continued development and well-being of the individual clinician. Participants anticipated feedback to be delivered electronically to minimise resource demands, with delivery initiated by the individual clinician. However, a level of support or supervision may also be required to minimise the potential for harmful consequences. Conclusions: Establishing a just feedback culture within paramedic practice may reduce a perceived isolation of clinical practice, enabling both individual development and progression of the profession. Carefully designed formal outcome feedback mechanisms should be initiated and subsequently evaluated to establish resultant benefits and costs.