• Vehicles and equipment for land-based neonatal transport

      Kempley, S. T.; Ratnavel, Nandiran; Fellows, T. (2009-08)
    • Videoscopes: an additional tool for managing the pre-hospital airway

      Hodkinson, Mark (2013-09)
      Abstract published with permission. Airway management by pre-hospital care providers is often the subject of intense debate. It is recognised that there are wide variations in clinical training and skill fade is high among paramedics due to lack of experience and exposure (Hodkinson, 2010). Recent years have seen the development of a wide variety of video based laryngoscope devices, several of which have potential application to the pre-hospital field. There are a number of advantages and disadvantages to these devices, which are explored in more detail. Prior to any recommendations being made, further research including clinical trials would be required in the pre-hospital field, to assess the suitability of videoscope devices for paramedic airway management.
    • The view from the Ebola Treatment Centre, Makeni, central Sierra Leone.

      Barnes, Solomon; Hussain, Nageena; Hogan, Julia; Logan, Victoria; Wardrope, Jim (2015-07)
    • What can dyslexic paramedic students teach us about mentoring? A case study

      Lavender, Rachael J.B. (2017-05)
      Abstract published with permission. The context or background for the study: this paper was written following a critical analysis and structured reflection on mentoring and teaching a dyslexic paramedic student including approaching from personal experience as well as identifying a gap in research. The purpose of this study was to discover what paramedic mentors can do to improve their interactions with dyslexic stu-dents. Basic procedures: following the experience of teaching one student, to work on this definition of dyslexia: "difficulties in processing, particularly literacy and the acquisition of reading, writing and spelling’." Using an analytical method – qualitative and reflective. Main findings: inclusive learning helps to fight stigma while improving education for all whether they dis-close dyslexia or not. There are many steps that can be taken by mentors to support stu-dents, including allowing time to think/to practise and support with organising. Conclusions: inclusive learning benefits all students, not just students with dyslexia. Students do not legally have to disclose a dyslexia diagnosis, so, introducing inclusive learning for all students using accessible and practical learning could benefit more students.
    • What is the most appropriate out-of-hospital opioid for adults with traumatic pain?

      Ellis, Pierre (2017-12-06)
      Methods: The literature search was carried out using multiple databases to identify relevant out-of-hospital research with additional grey literature to support. The main themes encountered were intravenous morphine compared to intravenous fentanyl, and the contrast between them. Discussion: There were no significant differences in effectiveness or adverse effects. Intranasal application was thought to be favoured where intravenous access was unobtainable. Conclusions: Further research is required to establish which is the most appropriate opioid. This could include a greater focus on the onset time, duration and optimal dose. Increased education and organisational focus would need to be addressed alongside a change in drug formulary for the out-of-hospital clinician. Abstract published with permission.
    • Where's the Fire?

      Copson, Anne (2008-12)
      As the UK explores the potential for fire services to act as first-responders to medical incidents, it is interesting that this research focuses on a system where fire services have traditionally been utilized as first-responders and where questions are now being asked as to whether this resource is appropriate for all emergency health care calls. The study included a ‘before-after’ design and set out to examine whether a selective emergency medical dispatch (EMD) system could reduce the frequency of deployment of fire department first-responder units and, if it did, whether this compromised patient safety. Abstract published with permission.
    • ‘You're never making just one decision’: exploring the lived experiences of ambulance Emergency Operations Centre personnel

      Coxon, Astrid; Cropley, Mark; Schofield, Pat; Start, Kath; Horsfield, Claire; Quinn, Tom (2016-09)
      Background The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of ambulance dispatch personnel, identifying key stressors and their impact on staff well-being. Methods Qualitative methodology was used. Nine semistructured interviews were conducted with National Health Service (NHS) ambulance Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) dispatch personnel in the UK between July and August 2014. Participants were asked about their experiences of the role, stress experienced and current strategies they use to deal with stress. Transcripts were analysed using an inductive, bottom-up thematic analysis. Results Three key themes were identified: (1) ‘How dispatch is perceived by others’, (2) ‘What dispatch really involves’ and (3) ‘Dealing with the stresses of dispatch’. All participants expressed pride in their work, but felt overloaded by the workload and undervalued by others. Several sources of additional stress, not directly related to the execution of their work, were identified, including the need to mentally unwind from work at the end of a shift. Participants were able to identify a number of ways in which they currently manage work-related stress, but they also suggested changes the organisation could put in place in order to reduce stress in the working environment. Conclusions Building on existing theory on work stress and postwork recovery, it was concluded that EOC dispatch staff require greater support at work, including skills training to promote postshift recovery, in order to reduce the likelihood of sickness absence, and prevent work-related fatigue. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/33/9/645.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2015-204841