• Comparison of manikin-based simulators and patient monitor simulators within paramedic education: the student perspective

      Mortimer, Craig (2017-12-14)
      Objective Investigate the impact to paramedic students of patient monitor simulators, when compared with manikin-based simulators within an educational programme. Design An exploratory study using an online questionnaire to gain qualitative and quantitative data. Setting One London university delivering a paramedic science programme. Participants A total of 136 paramedic students sponsored by a UK ambulance service were approached for this study. Data were received from 43 respondents (32%). Main outcome measures Comparison of simulators and their effect on student development through the identification of the student’s own perceived ability following use, perception of other’s ability (fellow students studying same course) following use and perception of the two pieces of simulation equipment available. Results The majority of respondents identified that simulation both increased their confidence and ability to demonstrate new knowledge and skills during simulation (97%) and further increased their ability to manage real patients (95%). Respondents agreed that there were advantages and disadvantages of using simulation, but these were not in line with those identified in previous studies. Instead of the human factors and non-technical skills outlined, students were much more practically focused on how the equipment performed. Conclusions This study suggests that there is a clear link between simulation and increased student confidence, but any issues encountered with the simulator equipment can reduce this benefit, causing the student’s learning environment to falter. Transitioning to monitor-based simulators is seen as a positive move, although the integration of manikins with this equipment is identified as being necessary. https://stel.bmj.com/content/4/2/65. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjstel-2017-000252
    • Student paramedic decision-making: a critical exploration of a patient interaction

      Costello, Barry; Downs, Simon (2021-02)
      Clinical decision-making is a multifaceted construct, requiring the practitioner to gather, interpret and evaluate data to select and implement an evidence-based choice of action. Clinical reasoning is a difficult skill for students to develop due in part to the inability to guarantee awareness or opportunity to develop within time spent in practice. While professional developments within the past few years have established a supportive preceptorship programme within NHS trusts for new paramedic registrants, enhancing activities to develop these crucial skills within a pre-registrant programme should be prioritised to enhance the abilities of students and subsequent new registrants. A better understanding of the reasoning processes used during clinical decision-making may help health professionals with less experience to develop their processes in their own clinical reasoning. To embed such awareness and enhanced practice, the lead author, a third-year student paramedic at the time of writing, presents a reflective consideration of a patient encounter using the hypothetico-deductive model to evaluate and critically explore his own reasoning and processing within a meaningful patient interaction. Abstract published with permission.