• Attitudes to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillator use: a survey of UK adults in 2017

      Hawkes, Claire A.; Brown, Terry P.; Booth, Scott; Fothergill, Rachael; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Zakaria, Sana; Askew, Sara; Williams, Julia; Rees, Nigel; Ji, Chen; et al. (2019-04)
    • Comparison of manikin-based simulators and patient monitor simulators within paramedic education: the student perspective

      Mortimer, Craig (2017-12-14)
      Objective Investigate the impact to paramedic students of patient monitor simulators, when compared with manikin-based simulators within an educational programme. Design An exploratory study using an online questionnaire to gain qualitative and quantitative data. Setting One London university delivering a paramedic science programme. Participants A total of 136 paramedic students sponsored by a UK ambulance service were approached for this study. Data were received from 43 respondents (32%). Main outcome measures Comparison of simulators and their effect on student development through the identification of the student’s own perceived ability following use, perception of other’s ability (fellow students studying same course) following use and perception of the two pieces of simulation equipment available. Results The majority of respondents identified that simulation both increased their confidence and ability to demonstrate new knowledge and skills during simulation (97%) and further increased their ability to manage real patients (95%). Respondents agreed that there were advantages and disadvantages of using simulation, but these were not in line with those identified in previous studies. Instead of the human factors and non-technical skills outlined, students were much more practically focused on how the equipment performed. Conclusions This study suggests that there is a clear link between simulation and increased student confidence, but any issues encountered with the simulator equipment can reduce this benefit, causing the student’s learning environment to falter. Transitioning to monitor-based simulators is seen as a positive move, although the integration of manikins with this equipment is identified as being necessary. https://stel.bmj.com/content/4/2/65. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjstel-2017-000252
    • Cooling of thermal burn injuries: a literature review

      Ashman, Harriet (2018-05)
      Abstract published with permission. Correct initial management of thermal burns is key in promoting patient outcomes. Cooling burns with cool running water (CRW) for 20 minutes has been shown to accelerate the wound healing process, improve cosmetic outcomes and prevent burn progression. This literature review aims to increase understanding of this simple first aid (FA) intervention, help inform paramedic practice, and determine areas for further research. Three themes came to light following systematic searching of the available literature. As a result of a paucity in evidence, a wide range of topics relating to cooling burns have been explored. The topics look at how patients and carers may approach FA in burns, how prehospital practitioners currently manage burns patients, and the best methods to use for cooling burns. Findings suggest that there is need for improved education for the lay public and pre-hospital providers in order to improve burn outcomes through FA interventions. While CRW is supported as a beneficial intervention, further research is required into alternative cooling methods to enhance care and evidence-based practice.
    • What can dyslexic paramedic students teach us about mentoring? A case study

      Lavender, Rachael J.B. (2017-05)
      Abstract published with permission. The context or background for the study: this paper was written following a critical analysis and structured reflection on mentoring and teaching a dyslexic paramedic student including approaching from personal experience as well as identifying a gap in research. The purpose of this study was to discover what paramedic mentors can do to improve their interactions with dyslexic stu-dents. Basic procedures: following the experience of teaching one student, to work on this definition of dyslexia: "difficulties in processing, particularly literacy and the acquisition of reading, writing and spelling’." Using an analytical method – qualitative and reflective. Main findings: inclusive learning helps to fight stigma while improving education for all whether they dis-close dyslexia or not. There are many steps that can be taken by mentors to support stu-dents, including allowing time to think/to practise and support with organising. Conclusions: inclusive learning benefits all students, not just students with dyslexia. Students do not legally have to disclose a dyslexia diagnosis, so, introducing inclusive learning for all students using accessible and practical learning could benefit more students.