• Adrenaline to improve survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: the PARAMEDIC2 RCT

      Perkins, Gavin; Ji, Chen; Achana, Felix; Black, John J.M.; Charlton, Karl; Crawford, James; de Paeztron, Adam; Deakin, Charles; Docherty, Mark; Finn, Judith; et al. (2021-04)
    • Decision making and safety in ambulance service transitions

      O'Hara, Rachel; Johnson, Maxine; Hirst, Enid; Weyman, Andrew; Shaw, Deborah; Mortimer, Peter; Newman, Chris; Storey, Matthew; Turner, Janette; Mason, Suzanne; et al. (2015-05)
      Introduction Decisions made by ambulance staff are often timecritical and based on limited information. Wrong decisions could have serious consequences for patients but little is known about areas of risk associated with decisions about patient care. We aimed to examine system in fluences on decision making in the ambulance service setting focusing on paramedic roles. Method An exploratory mixed methods qualitative study was conducted in three Ambulance Service Trusts. A document search and 16 interviews were conducted to understand service delivery in each Trust, how they link with other services and potential influences on decisions about patient care. Researchers observed ambulance crews on 34 shifts and 10 paramedics completed ‘digital diaries’ to report challenges for decision making or patient safety. Three focus groups with staff (N=21) and three with service users (N=23) were held to explore their views on decision making and patient safety. Data were charted to produce a typology of decisions then coded and thematically analysed to identify in fluences on those decisions. Findings Nine types of decision were identi fied, ranging from specialist emergency pathways to non-conveyance. In fluences on these decisions included communication with Control Room staff; patient assessment, decision support and alternative options to ED conveyance. Seven main issues in fluencing patient safety in decision making were identi fied: meeting demand; performance and priorities; access to care options; risk aversion; education, training and professional development for crews; communication and feedback to crews; resources and safety culture. Conclusions A range of decisions are made by ambulance staff in complex, time bound changing conditions. Training and development and access to alternative options to ED conveyance were identi fied as particularly important issues. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/32/5/e2.1.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2015-204880.4
    • Mixed methods in pre-hospital research: understanding complex clinical problems

      Whitley, Gregory; Munro, Scott; Hemingway, Pippa; Law, Graham Richard; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Cooke, Debbie; Quinn, Tom (2020-12-01)
      Healthcare is becoming increasingly complex. The pre-hospital setting is no exception, especially when considering the unpredictable environment. To address complex clinical problems and improve quality of care for patients, researchers need to use innovative methods to create the necessary depth and breadth of knowledge. Quantitative approaches such as randomised controlled trials and observational (e.g. cross-sectional, case control, cohort) methods, along with qualitative approaches including interviews, focus groups and ethnography, have traditionally been used independently to gain understanding of clinical problems and how to address these. Both approaches, however, have drawbacks: quantitative methods focus on objective, numerical data and provide limited understanding of context, whereas qualitative methods explore more subjective aspects and provide perspective, but can be harder to demonstrate rigour. We argue that mixed methods research, where quantitative and qualitative methods are integrated, is an ideal solution to comprehensively understand complex clinical problems in the pre-hospital setting. The aim of this article is to discuss mixed methods in the field of pre-hospital research, highlight its strengths and limitations and provide examples. This article is tailored to clinicians and early career researchers and covers the basic aspects of mixed methods research. We conclude that mixed methods is a useful research design to help develop our understanding of complex clinical problems in the pre-hospital setting. Abstract published with permission.
    • Perceived areas for future intervention and research addressing conveyance decisions and potential threats to patient safety: stakeholder workshops

      O'Hara, Rachel; Johnson, Maxine; Hirst, Enid; Weyman, Andrew; Shaw, Deborah; Mortimer, Peter; Newman, Chris; Storey, Matthew; Turner, Janette; Mason, Suzanne; et al. (2016-09)
      Background As part of a study examining systemic influences on conveyance decisions by paramedics and potential threats to patient safety, stakeholder workshops were conducted with three Ambulance Service Trusts in England. The study identified seven overarching systemic influences: demand; priorities; access to care; risk tolerance; training, communication and resources. The aim of the workshops was to elicit feedback on the findings and identify perceived areas for future intervention and research. Attendees were also asked to rank the seven threats to patient safety in terms of their perceived importance for future attention. Methods A total of 45 individuals attended across all the workshops, 28 ambulance service staff and 17 service user representatives. Discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. A paper based paired comparison approach was used to produce an ordinal ranking to illustrate the relative prioritisation of issues. Analysis included testing for internal consistency and between-rater agreement for this relatively small sample. Findings The two highest ranking priorities were training and development, as well as access to care. The areas for intervention identified represent what attendees perceived as feasible to undertake and relate to: care options; cross boundary working; managing demand; staff development; information and feedback; and commissioning decisions. Perceived areas for research specifically address conveyance decisions and potential threats to patient safety. 17 areas for research were proposed that directly relate to six of the systemic threats to patient safety. Conclusions Feedback workshops were effective in the validation of findings as well as providing an opportunity to identify priorities for future interventions and research. They also facilitated discussion between a variety of Ambulance Service staff and service user representatives. Ongoing collaboration between members of the research team has enabled some of the research recommendations to be explored as part of a mutually agreed research agenda. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/33/9/e7.3.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2016-206139.25
    • A pilot study evaluating the use of ABCD2 score in pre-hospital assessment of patients with suspected transient ischaemic attack: experience and lessons learned

      Munro, Scott F.S.; Rodbard, Sally; Ali, Khalid; Horsfield, Claire; Knibb, Wendy; Holah, Janet; Speirs, Ottilia; Quinn, Tom (2016-08)
    • PP19 Use and impact of the pre-hospital 12-lead electrocardiogram in the primary PCI era (PHECG2): mixed methods study protocol

      Munro, Scott; Gavalova, Lucia; Halter, Mary; Snooks, Helen; Gale, Chris P.; Weston, Clive; Watkins, Alan; Davies, Glenn; Hampton, Chelsey; Driscoll, Timothy; et al. (2019-09-24)
      Background The pre-hospital 12-lead electrocardiogram (PHECG) is recommended in patients presenting to emergency medical services (EMS) with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Prior research found PHECG was associated with improved 30-day survival, but a third of ACS patients under EMS care did not have PHECG. Such patients tended to be female, older and/or with comorbidities. This previous study was undertaken when thrombolytic treatment was the main treatment for ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI); practice has since shifted to a predominant interventional strategy – primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI). Moreover, the previous study relied solely on data collected by the Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project (MINAP), which does not include information on symptoms, EMS personnel gender, and other factors that may influence decision-making. The PHECG2 study addresses the following research questions: a) Is there a difference in 30-day mortality and reperfusion between those who do and do not receive PHECG? b) Has the proportion of eligible patients who receive PHECG changed since the introduction of pPCI networks? c) Are patients that receive PHECG different from those that do not in social and demographic factors, and in pre-hospital clinical presentation? d) What factors do EMS clinicians report as influencing their decision to perform PHECG? Methods Explanatory sequential Quan-Qual mixed methods study comprising 4 Work Packages (WPs): WP1 a population based, linked data analysis of MINAP from 2010–2017 (n=510,000); WP2 retrospective chart review of EMS records from 3 EMS; WP3 focus groups with personnel from 3 EMS. WP4 will synthesise findings from WP1-3. Conclusions Gaining an understanding into the clinical and non-clinical factors influencing EMS clinicians’ decisions to record PHECG will enable us to develop (and later test through a randomised trial) an intervention to improve PHECG uptake and patient outcomes following an ACS event., https://emj.bmj.com/content/36/10/e9.1. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2019-999abs.19
    • A qualitative study of decision-making and safety in ambulance service transitions

      O'Hara, Rachel; Johnson, Maxine; Hirst, Enid; Weyman, Andrew; Shaw, Deborah; Mortimer, Peter; Newman, Chris; Storey, Matthew; Turner, Janette; Mason, Suzanne; et al. (2014-12)
    • A qualitative study of systemic influences on paramedic decision making : care transitions and patient safety

      Shaw, Deborah; Mortimer, Peter; Newman, Chris; Storey, Matthew; Shewan, Jane; O'Hara, Rachel; Johnson, Maxine; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Weyman, Andrew; Turner, Janette; et al. (2015-01)
    • A randomized trial of epinephrine in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

      Perkins, Gavin D.; Ji, Chen; Deakin, Charles D.; Quinn, Tom; Nolan, Jerry P.; Scomparin, Charlotte; Regan, Scott; Long, John; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Pocock, Helen; et al. (2018-08)
    • The use and impact of 12-lead electrocardiograms in acute stroke patients: a systematic review

      Munro, Scott F.S.; Cooke, Debbie; Kiln-Barfoot, Valerie; Quinn, Tom (2018-04)
    • The use of prehospital 12-lead electrocardiograms in acute stroke patients

      Cooke, Debbie; Joy, Mark; Quinn, Tom (2018-04)
      AIM Emergency medical services (EMS) play a vital role in the recognition, management and transportation of acute stroke patients. UK guidelines recommend clinicians consider performing a prehospital 12-lead electrocardiogram (PHECG) in patients with suspected stroke , but this recommendation is based on expert consensus, rather than robust evidence. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between PHECG and modified Rankin scale (mRS). Secondary outcomes included in-hospital mortality, EMS and in-hospital time intervals and rates of thrombolysis received. Method A multicentre retrospective cohort study was undertaken. The data collection period spanned from 29/12/2013 – 30/01/2017. Participants were identified through secondary analysis of hospital data routinely collected as part of the Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme (SSNAP) and linked to EMS clinical records (PCRs) via EMS incident number. Results PHECG was performed in 558 (48%) of study patients. PHECG was associated with an increase in mRS (aOR 1.44, 95% CI: 1.14 to 1.82, p=0.002) and in-hospital mortality (aOR 2.07, 95% CI: 1.42 to 3.00, p=0.0001). There was no association between PHECG and administration of thrombolysis (aOR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.65 to 1.30, p=0.63). Patients who had a PHECG recorded spent longer under the care of EMS (median 49 vs 43 min, p=0.007). No difference in times to receiving brain scan (Median 28 with PHECG vs 29 min no PHECG, p=0.14) or thrombolysis (median 46 min vs 48 min, p=0.82) were observed. Conclusion This is the first study of its kind to investigate the association between PHECG and functional outcome in stroke patients attended by EMS. Although there are limitations in Abstracts BMJ Open 2018;8(Suppl 1):A1–A34 A5 Trust (NHS). Protected by copyright. on September 3, 2019 at Manchester University NHS Foundation http://bmjopen.bmj.com/ BMJ Open: first published as 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-EMS.14 on 16 April 2018. Downloaded from regard to the retrospective study design, the findings challenge current guideline recommendations regarding PHECG in patients with acute stroke. https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/bmjopen/8/Suppl_1/A5.3.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-EMS.14
    • ‘You're never making just one decision’: exploring the lived experiences of ambulance Emergency Operations Centre personnel

      Coxon, Astrid; Cropley, Mark; Schofield, Pat; Start, Kath; Horsfield, Claire; Quinn, Tom (2016-09)
      Background The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of ambulance dispatch personnel, identifying key stressors and their impact on staff well-being. Methods Qualitative methodology was used. Nine semistructured interviews were conducted with National Health Service (NHS) ambulance Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) dispatch personnel in the UK between July and August 2014. Participants were asked about their experiences of the role, stress experienced and current strategies they use to deal with stress. Transcripts were analysed using an inductive, bottom-up thematic analysis. Results Three key themes were identified: (1) ‘How dispatch is perceived by others’, (2) ‘What dispatch really involves’ and (3) ‘Dealing with the stresses of dispatch’. All participants expressed pride in their work, but felt overloaded by the workload and undervalued by others. Several sources of additional stress, not directly related to the execution of their work, were identified, including the need to mentally unwind from work at the end of a shift. Participants were able to identify a number of ways in which they currently manage work-related stress, but they also suggested changes the organisation could put in place in order to reduce stress in the working environment. Conclusions Building on existing theory on work stress and postwork recovery, it was concluded that EOC dispatch staff require greater support at work, including skills training to promote postshift recovery, in order to reduce the likelihood of sickness absence, and prevent work-related fatigue. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/33/9/645.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2015-204841