• What happened on Restart a Heart Day 2017 in England?

      Brown, Terry P.; Perkins, Gavin D.; Lockey, Andrew S.; Soar, Jasmeet; Askew, Sara; Mersom, Frank; Fothergill, Rachael; Cox, Emma; Black, Sarah; Lumley-Holmes, Jenny (2018-09)
    • What is your ‘normal’?

      Smith, Daniel (2019-02-04)
    • What makes clinicians decide to use spinal immobilisation? A review of the literature

      Cornah, Julia (2014-04)
      Abstract published with permission. Current practice of spinal immobilisation appears to be based heavily on historical practice rather than scientific precedence. Evidence shows that it is common practice to immobilise patients, yet studies demonstrating the benefit of this is limited. The decision made by the clinician to immobilise a patient is based on fear of reprisal, caution and ritualised practice rather than robust clinical assessment or a definitive criteria. A global, standardised criteria and robust immobilisation method is yet to be established. This article will examine and critically analyse existing literature surrounding patient immobilisation following a suspected or confirmed acute neck injury. In particular, literature on the use of a cervical collar and head blocks and the use of clinician decision tools will be critically analysed.
    • Where to now? Searching beyond Medline

      Holland, Matt; Dutton, Michelle; Glover, Steve (2021-02-10)
      This article looks at the tools available to you to extend your search beyond the major bibliographic sources. The article identifies the type of literature you can find and which tools are suitable to use to find them. It aims to help you to broaden the scope of your search to find more relevant material. There is a warning about predatory journals and the need to take a critical approach to material that has not been peer-reviewed. Abstract published with permission.
    • Why evaluation is important to you, me and everybody

      Simpson, Karen (2014-11)
      Abstract published with permission. The Health and Care Professionals Council (HCPC) suggest that the use of operational evaluation and monitoring contributes to the creation of correct and current assessment standards (HCPC, 2009). This short article is aimed at anyone who attends training courses including mandatory, induction, CPD, management and clinical skills, and explores the theory of evaluation and its benefit in adding depth and value to all training purposes.
    • Why take a peak flow in asthma – a review

      van Wamel, Annelies; Procter, Shaun (2010-02)
      Current asthma protocols advocate the measurement of peak flow expiratory rate (PEFR) by staff in pre-hospital care in their assessment and management of acute asthma. Yet in practice many, if not most, omit to do this. The limited amount of recent research available – which has been conducted by doctors and accident and emergency staff and concerns patients admitted to accident and emergency departments – shows that PEFR is one of the best, if not the best, predictive assessment tool available to ambulance staff. Pulse oximetry and PEFR do not measure the same things and cannot replace each other. Not taking a pre- and post-treatment PEFR is potentially detrimental to patient care and does not comply with Joint Royal Colleges Service Liaison Committee and British Thoracic Society standards. Paramedic-led research on assessment and management of acute asthma in pre-hospital settings is lacking. Abstract published with permission.
    • Write, reflect and be human

      Smith, Daniel (2019-03-13)