• The art and science of mentorship in action

      Jones, Paul; Comber, Jason; Conboy, Adrian (2012-08)
      Abstract published with permission. The authors have collaborated to produce this article bringing together more than 60years of combined experience of paramedic practice, education and management. All maintain their paramedic registration and have among their goals the advancement and development of knowledge, skills and professionalism to promote an effective contemporary paramedic who continues to meet the care needs of the communities they serve. Practice mentors are pivotal to the success of a modern, fit-for-purpose paramedic curriculum that requires a significant proportion of learning and assessment to take place in the practice setting. This article focuses on the support that is needed for mentors during major professional and organisational change. Change which is aligned to localised multifaceted organisational strategies and change which includes supporting mentors, enabling them to carry out their function professionally, effectively and with confidence. This article discusses experiences of a collaborative, structured approach to mentorship support which is achieved through organisational, educational and professional alliances. It also explores other approaches and suggests a way forward in terms of a national governance framework.
    • A clinical review of the indications for, and subsequent implementation of, a pilot pre-hospital sepsis pathway within NWAS

      Butterworth, Daniel (2015-10)
      Abstract published with permission. Aim: Review the clinical evidence for, and introduce a modified ‘Red Flag’ sepsis screening tool, treatment pathway and associated education package into a pilot site within the North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust (NWAS) and evaluate its impact. Methods: Retrospective application of a modified ‘Red Flag’ sepsis screening tool to 259 hospital confirmed cases of sepsis to evaluate the current identification and treatment of sepsis within NWAS.A subsequent prospective pilot launch of the tool within central Manchester in collaboration with Salford Royal Foundation Trust and Central Manchester Foundation Trust hospital emergency departments,collecting and analysing 100 cases of suspected sepsis in which the screening tool has been utilised. Results: The modified ‘Red Flag’ sepsis tool was found to be highly sensitive when applied retrospectively. Only 46% of confirmed severe sepsis cases were found to show hypotension (systolic BP <90 mmHg) pre-hospital. In the pilot,complete analysis of Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) criteria and a suspicion and documentation of sepsis increased from 15% to 94%. Compliance with a bundle of care in suspected severe sepsis cases increased from 10% to 90%. Conclusions: The introduction of a modified ‘Red Flag’ screening tool significantly improved pre-hospital sepsis identification and treatment within the pilot site. Paramedics were able to give fluid boluses to normotensive patients in suspected severe sepsis safely without adverse incident.
    • Kerbside consultations: advice from the advanced paramedic to the frontline

      Jackson, Mike; Jones, Colin (2012-09)
      Abstract published with permission. Aim To observe the issues, benefits and challenges of providing dynamic telephone clinical advice to frontline clinicians by advanced paramedics of the North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust. Method In order to focus on the key issues the study used a mixed method approach. A group of 11 advanced paramedics took part in two focus groups which was then followed up with a questionnaire to frontline clinicians. Using focus groups in the research not only allows for the possibility of multiple realities but also for participant validation. Using a qualitative approach allowed theory to develop and emerge which was then codified into themes and the data was then used to develop a questionnaire for frontline clinicians who had received clinical advice in the past in order to provide an element of quantitative data. Findings Five themes emerged from the stud: function, responsibility, barriers, education and support. Conclusion The study finds that clarity is required in relation to responsibilities and clinicians would benefit from a structured model to communicate information over the telephone—we believe the introduction of remote advice has improved patient safety and support to staff and has created opportunity for additional learning.
    • NWAS Library and Information Service

      Holland, Matt (2009-12-18)
      Matt Holland is Outreach Librarian in the North West Ambulance Service. Here he explains his unique role, and the steps involved in the development of a Library Information Service. Abstract published with permission.
    • Practice education in paramedic science: theories and application

      Romano, Vincent (2021-01-02)
      This book is immediately recognisable as another Class Professional Publishing release. For me, this sets the expectation high given the number of previous good quality releases. They are often written by experts in their field and are very paramedic-focused. I was curious if this trend would be followed given it is addressing education—a topic that often draws much of its evidence from the nursing profession, especially around mentorship. However, both authors are registered paramedics with a background in education and have gained their own relevant qualifications. This gives the reader further confidence that this book will be aimed at the learning environment specifically within the prehospital setting. Abstract published with permission.
    • The reality of role play

      Smith, Daniel (2019-04-08)
    • The secrets of success

      First, Sue; McGregor, Erica (2006-12-01)
    • Using social media for good

      Smith, Daniel (2019-09-11)
    • What happened on Restart a Heart Day 2017 in England?

      Brown, Terry P.; Perkins, Gavin D.; Lockey, Andrew S.; Soar, Jasmeet; Askew, Sara; Mersom, Frank; Fothergill, Rachael; Cox, Emma; Black, Sarah; Lumley-Holmes, Jenny (2018-09)
    • Why evaluation is important to you, me and everybody

      Simpson, Karen (2014-11)
      Abstract published with permission. The Health and Care Professionals Council (HCPC) suggest that the use of operational evaluation and monitoring contributes to the creation of correct and current assessment standards (HCPC, 2009). This short article is aimed at anyone who attends training courses including mandatory, induction, CPD, management and clinical skills, and explores the theory of evaluation and its benefit in adding depth and value to all training purposes.