• Just don't call me sir!

      Smith, Daniel (2019-06-08)
    • Knowing our specialist roles

      Smith, Daniel (2019-08-07)
    • Paramedic clinical leadership

      Martin, John; Swinburn, Andy (2012-03)
      Developing the paramedic profession is at the heart of the mission for the College of Paramedics. As any profession develops it evolves to take leadership and responsibility for a growing body of knowledge that informs practice. Back in 2008 the College published the second edition of the curriculum framework for paramedics clearly outlining the need for the development of roles at a variety of clinical levels. Having these levels populated creates a clinical framework that will deliver patient benefit and develop future paramedic practice. At its recent Council meeting the College outlined the need to develop education standards, clinical guidelines, and voluntary regulation for these emerging elements on the career framework, and is set to do this over the coming year. In this article Andy Swinburn the College Council representative for NW region outlines how the North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust has put into place a structured career development spanning the professional roles from first registration to consultant practice. https://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/full/10.12968/jpar.2012.4.3.181 ] This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/jpar.2012.4.3.181
    • The reality of role play

      Smith, Daniel (2019-04-08)
    • Using social media for good

      Smith, Daniel (2019-09-11)
    • The utilisation of a structured debriefing framework within the pre-hospital environment: a service evaluation

      Tierney, Shaun (2018-06)
      Abstract published with permission. Background: Debriefing improves care and reduces error. To be effective, debriefs should be facilitated by trained individuals utilising structured and validated tools. Currently, in UK ambulance services there is no published evidence that structured processes utilising validated tools are being consistently delivered by trained facilitators, potentially impacting clinical practice. Methods: A pre-intervention survey related to debriefing was sent to 1000 clinicians within a specific geographical area of the trust via e-mail. In addition, 12 senior or advanced paramedics were recruited from the same area to participate in a training day and 12-week trial, utilising the Debrief Diamond as part of post-event debriefing. Following the trial period, all facilitators and participants of any recorded debriefs were invited to complete a post-intervention survey. Results: A total of 130 staff responded to the pre-intervention survey, with 22% reporting that previous debriefs had not identified areas for learning, and 13% reporting that previous debriefs had not identified good practice, learning opportunities or near misses. Post-intervention, 89% believed the process of debriefing was improved utilising a structured framework, 85% stated trained individuals improved the process, 93% reported the identification of good practice, 70% identified team level learning and 100% of facilitators reported improvements in identifying and supporting learning. Conclusion: Improvements in identifying good practice and learning opportunities were reported by both clinicians and facilitators in this evaluation, reflecting current evidence that structured and facilitated debriefs support safer care through the identification and subsequent reduction of human error. Consequently, the evaluation of appropriate debrief frameworks to provide consistency and validity to clinical debriefs in the pre-hospital environment should be considered to support safer clinical care.