• Exploratory study into the views of paramedics on paramedic prescribing

      Duffy, Iain; Jones, Colin (2017-07)
      Abstract published with permission. The purpose of this paper is to establish the views of a group of Paramedics on Paramedic prescribing. Although at the time of writing the proposal to the Commission on Human Medicines they rejected prescribing for Paramedics, work is still ongoing with various bodies to move forward with the application. A focus group of a small number of Paramedics was held, and the researcher performed a review of relevant literature. The development of the role of paramedic from an ambulance driver to a highly skilled and knowledgeable healthcare professional was discussed. It was established that the profession's close links with higher education institutions would be pivotal if paramedics are to be given prescribing rights. The study concluded that paramedics believe they should be able to become independent prescribers, as it would help further their career, giving the profession added credibility. As paramedics already give a rounded healthcare approach to their patients, this would only be enhanced by prescribing rights, as a ‘complete’ health care attitude could be established.
    • GP perspectives of paramedic referrals to urgent and primary care

      Burns, John (2018-07)
      Abstract published with permission. Background: This article stemmed from a search for more understanding about how paramedics relate to urgent and primary care (U&PC). Methods: The current study is qualitative, involving interview with seven general practitioners (GPs) in Wirral, Merseyside. Their verbatim evidence was audiorecorded, transcribed and analysed. Findings: There were three superordinate themes established: variability of referrals; the value of referrals sometimes being overlooked; and the need for skills development to improve referrals. Conclusion: The paramedic skillset is essential for appropriate referrals as long as their limitations are considered by GPs, while future research should focus on how paramedic skill bases can evolve in the U&PC community.
    • Paramedic research literature 2011–2019. A bibliographic analysis of the contents of Amber, the ambulance research repository

      Holland, Matt; Dutton, Michelle (2020-10)
      The data held by amber presents an opportunity to understand the structure of the published paramedic literature, specifically the output of NHS staff working in English ambulance services 2011–2019. This period is of interest because it represents part of the development phase of paramedic research in England. The authors apply a series of bibliometric measures to generate a profile of the published literature. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/37/10/e9.3.full.pdf. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2020-999abs.19