• Creating authentic video scenarios for use in prehospital research

      Preston, Christopher; Carter, Bernie; Jack, Barbara; Bray, Lucy (2017-05)
    • Developing and diversifying

      Smith, Daniel (2019-07-10)
    • From trade to profession-the professionalisation of the paramedic workforce

      First, Sue; Tomlins, Lucy; Swinburn, Andy (2012-07)
      Abstract published with permission. How do we achieve professionalisation of the paramedic? The Trait theory identifies professions as having 1. An exclusive body of knowledge 2. Self regulation and 3. Registration. Becoming a profession leads to improved remuneration and greater respect and knowledge, but this does not lead to a change in personal conduct. Professionalism however, is connected to behaviour, attitudes, accountability and responsibility. The behavioural changes and attitudes required of a ‘professional’ are brought about through the combination of higher education and clinical leadership. Academic input integrates clinical leadership with the career structure and all staff at all levels. Clinical leaders are at the coal face, accessible during and after the event, for training and clinical supervision and are therefore transforming practice at every level. However, clinical leadership is ineffective with an uneducated workforce and an uneducated workforce is ineffective without clinical leadership, the two go hand in hand So... What is the way forward for the ambulance service? What are paramedics doing to develop and maintain the profession and professional behaviours?
    • Knowing our specialist roles

      Smith, Daniel (2019-08-07)
    • NWAS Library and Information Service

      Holland, Matt (2009-12-18)
      Matt Holland is Outreach Librarian in the North West Ambulance Service. Here he explains his unique role, and the steps involved in the development of a Library Information Service. Abstract published with permission.
    • Paramedic attitudes towards DNACPR orders

      Armitage, Ewan; Jones, Colin (2017-10)
      Abstract published with permission. Background: Qualitative research involving paramedics and their involvement in end-of-life (EoL) care has already been published, but there have been no published attitudinal studies specifically relating to do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (DNACPR) orders and paramedics working in the pre-hospital setting in the UK. Objective: To gain an understanding of paramedic attitudes towards an increasingly common aspect of paramedic practice, focusing specifically on the pre-hospital environment and identifying any corelation between gender, length of service, and level of educational attainment. Design: A paper-based questionnaire was distributed to all paramedic grades, operational out of two ambulance stations of a regional NHS ambulance service in March 2017. The questionnaires were designed using a combination of free-text boxes and Likert scales. A total of 33 questionnaires were issued and 11 completed questionnaires were returned. Results: Respondents indicated the importance of communication in relation to DNACPR orders, as well as the role of allied health professionals and family members in the process. Respecting the patient’s wishes was considered paramount, as was educational provision surrounding DNACPRs. Conclusion: The majority of respondents reported that they were comfortable incorporating DNACPR orders in their clinical practice, although more modest responses were returned regarding the level of education received in this area of paramedicine.
    • Practice education in paramedic science: theories and application

      Romano, Vincent (2021-01-02)
      This book is immediately recognisable as another Class Professional Publishing release. For me, this sets the expectation high given the number of previous good quality releases. They are often written by experts in their field and are very paramedic-focused. I was curious if this trend would be followed given it is addressing education—a topic that often draws much of its evidence from the nursing profession, especially around mentorship. However, both authors are registered paramedics with a background in education and have gained their own relevant qualifications. This gives the reader further confidence that this book will be aimed at the learning environment specifically within the prehospital setting. Abstract published with permission.
    • The reality of role play

      Smith, Daniel (2019-04-08)
    • Where to now? Searching beyond Medline

      Holland, Matt; Dutton, Michelle; Glover, Steve (2021-02-10)
      This article looks at the tools available to you to extend your search beyond the major bibliographic sources. The article identifies the type of literature you can find and which tools are suitable to use to find them. It aims to help you to broaden the scope of your search to find more relevant material. There is a warning about predatory journals and the need to take a critical approach to material that has not been peer-reviewed. Abstract published with permission.