• Can paramedics avoid A&E departments with patients complaining of non-traumatic chest pain?

      Best, Pete (2017-04)
      Abstract published with permission. The ‘Paramedic Pathfinder’, a triage tool for paramedics, contains a discriminator for patients complaining of non-traumatic chest pain. The pathfinder advises all patients with non-traumatic chest pain to be taken to hospital. Given a background of large numbers of patients complaining of chest pain and the policy direction of UK ambulance services to treat patients closer to home, the inclusion of discriminator in the pathfinder can be challenged. A greater understanding of ACS, university education for paramedics, bedside troponin measurement, ACS risk scoring, current NICE guidelines and rapid access chest pain clinics have been identified as enablers to remove the discriminator safely and assist paramedics in finding suitable alternatives to Accident and Emergency for certain patients. Risk is an important factor in discussing chest pain and establishing the best pathway for patients. The enablers identified need further testing and development in the pre-hospital environment before they can be utilised.
    • Paramedic administration of glycoprotein inhibitors for ST elevation myocardial infarction

      Dykes, Simon (2012-08-16)
      Abstract published with permission. Until recently, paramedics were routinely delivering out-of-hospital thrombolysis for ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Now that primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) is the favoured reperfusion strategy, STEMI patients are by-passing the local emergency department and taken directly to the catheterisation laboratory via ambulance. STEMI patients within a rural setting are facing the prospect of extended transfer times for reperfusion of an already ischaemic myocardium, a potentially perilous strategy. Empirical research conducted outside the UK has identified that the pre-hospital administration of a glycoprotein inhibitor improves clinical outcome for STEMI patients. Glycoprotein naturally helps to build the fibrin mesh essential within the clotting process. Inhibition of this process by glycoprotein inhibitors IIb/IIIa (GPI IIb/IIIa) prevents aggregation at receptor sites on platelets. Original research supports the notion that GPI IIb/IIIa involvement improves patient clinical outcome for STEMI in the out-of-hospital phase. Paramedics are typically the first contact for the STEMI patient and it is tangible that paramedics have the appropriate skill and knowledge to diagnose the out-of-hospital STEMI. With this in mind, it is the purpose of this article to discuss the use of pre-hospital GPI IIb/IIIa administration and to argue that this intervention should be administered by paramedic personnel.
    • PRe-hospital Evaluation of Sensitive TrOponin (PRESTO) Study: multicentre prospective diagnostic accuracy study protocol

      Alghamdi, Abdulrhman; Cook, Eloïse; Carlton, Edward; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Hann, Mark; Thompson, Alexander; Foulkes, Angela; Phillips, John; Cooper, Jamie; Steve, Bell; et al. (2019-10-07)
      Introduction Within the UK, chest pain is one of the most common reasons for emergency (999) ambulance calls and the most common reason for emergency hospital admission. Diagnosing acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in a patient with chest pain in the prehospital setting by a paramedic is challenging. The Troponin-only Manchester Acute Coronary Syndromes (T-MACS) decision rule is a validated tool used in the emergency department (ED) to stratify patients with suspected ACS following a single blood test. We are seeking to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the T-MACS decision aid algorithm to ‘rule out’ ACS when used in the prehospital environment with point-of-care troponin assays. If successful, this could allow paramedics to immediately rule out ACS for patients in the ‘very low risk’ group and avoid the need for transport to the ED, while also risk stratifying other patients using a single blood sample taken in the prehospital setting. Methods and analysis We will recruit patients who call emergency (999) ambulance services where the responding paramedic suspects cardiac chest pain. The data required to apply T-MACS will be prospectively recorded by paramedics who are responding to each patient. Paramedics will be required to draw a venous blood sample at the time of arrival to the patient. Blood samples will later be tested in batches for cardiac troponin, using commercially available troponin assays. The primary outcome will be a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, established at the time of initial hospital admission. The secondary outcomes will include any major adverse cardiac events within 30 days of enrolment. Ethics and dissemination The study obtained approval from the National Research Ethics Service (reference: 18/ES/0101) and the Health Research Authority. We will publish our findings in a high impact general medical journal.Abstract, URL This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-032834