• Acute quadriceps injury: a case study

      Newton, Mark; Walker, Jacqui (2004-12)
    • The secrets of success

      First, Sue; McGregor, Erica (2006-12-01)
    • Asthma: an overview of prehospital care

      Scholes, Steven (2008-12)
      Asthma exacerbations are characterized by progressive increase in shortness of breath, decrease in expiratory airflow, productive or non-productive cough, wheezing and feeling of chest tightness. Emergency hospital admissions for asthma are costly and it is estimated 75% are avoidable through effective asthma management and routine care. This article addresses asthma management in prehospital care explaining relevant underlying pathophysiology of asthma exacerbations to provide clinicians with a greater understanding of asthma and its pharmacological and ventilatory management. Abstract published with permission.
    • Administering naloxone: is the answer under our noses?

      Bisset, Elspeth (2009-06-01)
      The intranasal (IN) administration of naloxone to treat opioid overdoses offers many benefi ts over the current, often problematic intravenous and intramuscular routes. Such problems include using sharps around potentially aggressive patients; a high risk of transmitting blood-borne infections and diffi culty obtaining intravenous access in injecting drug users. A literature search was undertaken to examine the effectiveness of the IN route of naloxone administration in comparison to these other routes. Research suggests that the IN route is safe to introduce into practice and it is effective: the time taken from ambulance staff arriving at opioid overdose patients to them responding to IN naloxone appears to equal that of the intravenous route. Intranasal naloxone is not yet licensed for use in the UK and this needs to be reviewed. In the future this method of drug administration should result in considerable benefits and improved safety to both ambulance staff and patients, particularly for the treatment of opioid overdoses. Abstract published with permission
    • The future of air ambulance services in trauma care

      Davies, Douglas (2009-12-18)
      This article explores the development of air ambulances from being vehicles for inter-hospital transfers to being the modern frontline resources for prehospital care. The service models currently utilised by the various air ambulance charities are explored, as is the influence each of these may have on the delivery of patient care. The organizational structure of air ambulance charities is addressed, as it also impacts upon service delivery and the governance of clinical practice. This area gives rise to an exploration of the potential for air ambulances to offer a unique platform for the development of the paramedic profession and an expanded scope of clinical practice. The article also explores the effect of wider changes within health care and how this impacts upon the services provided by air ambulances. Analysis of potential future developments based upon a number of factors is made and conclusions drawn with regard to both current and future practice development. Abstract published with permission.
    • NWAS Library and Information Service

      Holland, Matt (2009-12-18)
      Matt Holland is Outreach Librarian in the North West Ambulance Service. Here he explains his unique role, and the steps involved in the development of a Library Information Service. Abstract published with permission.
    • COPD: an overview of prehospital care

      Scholes, Steven; Hedges, Nicola (2009-12-18)
      Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the name for a collection of lung diseases including chronic bronchitis, emphysema and chronic obstructive airways disease. It is a debilitating airways disease which presents to the ambulance service with varying severity and is characterized by airflow obstruction which is usually progressive, not fully reversible and does not change markedly over several months. It may coexist with other comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease, making diagnosis of exacerbations difficult. COPD management in the prehospital environment is focused on effective recognition and the early application of pharmacological intervention to alleviate symptoms using current Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee Guidelines. Abstract published with permission.
    • Stroke knowledge and awareness: an integrative review of the evidence

      Jones, Stephanie P.; Jenkinson, Amanda J.; Leathley, Michael J.; Watkins, Caroline L. (2010-01)
    • Why take a peak flow in asthma – a review

      van Wamel, Annelies; Procter, Shaun (2010-02)
      Current asthma protocols advocate the measurement of peak flow expiratory rate (PEFR) by staff in pre-hospital care in their assessment and management of acute asthma. Yet in practice many, if not most, omit to do this. The limited amount of recent research available – which has been conducted by doctors and accident and emergency staff and concerns patients admitted to accident and emergency departments – shows that PEFR is one of the best, if not the best, predictive assessment tool available to ambulance staff. Pulse oximetry and PEFR do not measure the same things and cannot replace each other. Not taking a pre- and post-treatment PEFR is potentially detrimental to patient care and does not comply with Joint Royal Colleges Service Liaison Committee and British Thoracic Society standards. Paramedic-led research on assessment and management of acute asthma in pre-hospital settings is lacking. Abstract published with permission.
    • Joint Royal College Ambulance Liaison Committee Airway Working Group commentary

      Jackson, Mike (2010-03)
      The publication of the paper by the Joint Royal College Ambulance Liaison Committee Airway Working Group (JRCALC AWG) will no doubt start a fierce debate among the paramedic and medical professions about prehospital intubation. Prehospital intubation performed by paramedics is a profession-defining skill, has been practised by paramedics in the UK for over 20 years, and has been a mainstay of prehospital airway management. In a survey of paramedics in the USA, prehospital intubation was ranked as a more important skill than defibrillation and patient assessment.1 Most of the literature reviewed by the JRCALC AWG was from the USA and included studies of drug-assisted intubation. Wang and associates2 examined 592 attempts at intubation in one year and found 536 of these to be successful (90.5%); another study of 264 paediatric prehospital intubations reported a much higher success rate of 99%,3 Bulger and colleagues4 in Seattle reported a success rate of 98.4% and in Bellingham, Washington, Wayne and Friedland5 reported a 95.5% success rate. It must be said that there are significant differences in the training and education of paramedics between the USA and the UK. The national standard curriculum for emergency medical technicians in the USA6 states that paramedics require only five successful intubations before graduation, whereas in the UK until recently paramedics needed to achieve 25 successful intubations. It is recognised that achieving intubation of the trachea does not necessarily mean the individual is proficient or competent in the skill of intubation. However, it must also be noted that achieving 25 intubations provides the paramedic with a higher degree of proficiency and competency than those achieving five. Limited capacity in the clinical placement circuit and the increased use of supraglottic devices for anaesthetic procedures in hospital means that paramedics are having difficulty in achieving the target of 25; as a result the accreditation bodies no longer demand that the 25 target is met, although there is still a need to learn the skill. In the future it is likely that training opportunities will be even more difficult to secure, and so the profession now finds itself at a crossroads. We need to look at what is right and what is safe for the patient, and importantly what is achievable by the profession. This will mean looking for alternative ways of achieving competence, for example, human simulation laboratories or looking at alternative airways. Recent evidence suggests that increasing the intubation experience of paramedics leads to better prehospital outcomes.7 Further evidence suggests there is no difference between experienced paramedics and doctors in performing successful intubation in prehospital cardiac arrest.8 Therefore, rather than removing the skill of intubation for all paramedics the focus should be on ensuring a proportion, for example, those in senior or advanced roles, are given the opportunity to acquire the necessary experience. If we adopt this approach the more exposure these clinicians will have the more proficient they will become, and this will result in improved outcomes. The JRCALC AWG has recognised this as a possible solution to the current problem. Ambulance services would be able to structure their response model to reflect this clinical provision and use these senior clinicians appropriately, not only to provide the expertise but also to supervise and lead on patient care at critical incidents. By using these senior clinicians the impact upon operational performance and resources will be minimised. With the training and revalidation problems we face the time is right for newly qualified paramedics and existing ones unable to maintain their intubation skills to adopt an alternative to intubation. Supraglottic airway devices are an alternative to intubation, but the suggestion by the JRCALC AWG that we should simply replace prehospital intubation by paramedics with supraglottic devices needs to be debated and researched. There is little evidence to support the effectiveness of supraglottic devices in prehospital non-fasted patients. Research to date has focussed primarily on the use of these devices in hospitals. We have no evidence to suggest that these devices are safe outside of hospitals; thus we need further research about their effectiveness. It is a gold standard in trauma that drug-assisted intubation is the best way to intubate the patient, and it is accepted that this should only be done by skilled operatives who perform the procedure regularly. However, although the JRCALC AWG agrees there is little evidence that prehospital intubation without anaesthetic drugs improves patient outcomes, there is also little evidence (especially from the UK) that prehospital intubation in patients in cardiac arrest is harmful. There are many examples in medicine in which treatment is given when it has not been proved to be effective, but the treatment continues as there is no evidence it is harmful. As there is no UK evidence that prehospital intubation by paramedics is harmful, the profession needs to continue this practice for patients in cardiac arrest—but with the skill performed by experienced senior and advanced paramedics working in a robust governance framework to ensure revalidation and maintenance of these skills. In the meantime, we need to explore the use of alternative devices including supraglottic devices, to decide if they are safe as an alternative to prehospital intubation especially for cardiac arrest, and to see if they will improve patient outcomes., https://emj.bmj.com/content/27/3/171.long. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2009.090381
    • Paramedic application of ultrasound in the management of patients in the prehospital setting: a review of the literature

      Brooke, Mike; Walton, Julie; Scutt, Diane (2010-07-28)
      ABSTRACT Objectives Recently, attempts have been made to identify the utility of ultrasound in the management of patients in the prehospital setting. However, in the UK there is no directly relevant supporting evidence that prehospital ultrasound may reduce patient mortality and morbidity. The evidence available to inform this debate is almost entirely obtained from outside the UK, where emergency medical services (EMS) routinely use doctors as part of their model of service delivery. Using a structured review of the literature available, this paper examines the evidence to determine ‘Is there a place for paramedic ultrasound in the management of patients in the prehospital setting?’ Method A structured review of the literature to identify clinical trials which examined the use of ultrasound by non-physicians in the prehospital setting. Results Four resources were identified with sufficient methodological rigour to accurately inform the research question. Conclusion The theoretical concept that paramedicinitiated prehospital ultrasound may be of benefit in the management of critically ill patients is not without logical conceptual reason. Studies to date have demonstrated that with the right education and mentorship, some paramedic groups are able to obtain ultrasound images of sufficient quality to positively identify catastrophic pathologies found in critically ill patients. More research is required to demonstrate that these findings are transferable to the infrastructure of the UK EMS, and in what capacity they may be used to help facilitate optimal patient outcomes. https://emj.bmj.com/content/27/9/702.long This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ doi: 10.1136/bmj.h535
    • Paramedic application of ultrasound in the management of patients in the prehospital setting: a review of the literature

      Brooke, Mike; Walton, Julie; Scutt, Diane (2010-07-28)
      Objectives Recently, attempts have been made to identify the utility of ultrasound in the management of patients in the prehospital setting. However, in the UK there is no directly relevant supporting evidence that prehospital ultrasound may reduce patient mortality and morbidity. The evidence available to inform this debate is almost entirely obtained from outside the UK, where emergency medical services (EMS) routinely use doctors as part of their model of service delivery. Using a structured review of the literature available, this paper examines the evidence to determine ‘Is there a place for paramedic ultrasound in the management of patients in the prehospital setting?’ Method A structured review of the literature to identify clinical trials which examined the use of ultrasound by non-physicians in the prehospital setting. Results Four resources were identified with sufficient methodological rigour to accurately inform the research question. Conclusion The theoretical concept that paramedic-initiated prehospital ultrasound may be of benefit in the management of critically ill patients is not without logical conceptual reason. Studies to date have demonstrated that with the right education and mentorship, some paramedic groups are able to obtain ultrasound images of sufficient quality to positively identify catastrophic pathologies found in critically ill patients. More research is required to demonstrate that these findings are transferable to the infrastructure of the UK EMS, and in what capacity they may be used to help facilitate optimal patient outcomes. https://emj.bmj.com/content/27/9/702. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2010.094219
    • Managing neck breathing patients in the prehospital setting: review of best practice

      Brooke, Mike; Brown, Andrea (2010-11)
      An increasing number of patients with long-term tracheostomies or laryngectomies are being managed in the community. However, recent evidence suggests that many clinicians from both the hospital and prehospital setting lack sufficient skills and knowledge to safely manage them in emergency situations. This article describes the anatomical and pathophysiological variations that may be encountered in tracheostomy and laryngectomy patients, and relates them to the adaptations that may be required when managing this group of patients in the prehospital setting. Abstract published with permission.
    • The prehospital early warning triage tool

      Earley, Darren (2010-12)
      The purpose of this article is to provide background information and guidance in the use of the prehospital early warning triage tool (PHEWT); and completion of the PHEWT documentation. The system is intended to provide an aid to prehospital care clinicians in ensuring all patients (ages 16 years and above) are triaged and conveyed to the department or unit best suited to their needs. In order to bring this triage system to fruition, a forward thinking ambulance service could take this on as a well constructed, multi-centre validation study. The article itself is simply the generation of that idea. Abstract published with permission.
    • The unique advantages of advanced paramedic practitioners

      Brown, Lucy; Hedgecock, Liz; Simm, Catherine; Swift, Juliette; Swinburn, Andy (2011-03-22)
    • Potential applications of capnography in the prehospital setting

      Percival, David (2012-01)
      Abstract published with permission. End-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) monitoring is well established in hospital theatre and critical care settings (Lah and Grmec, 2010), employed for observation and monitoring in anaesthesia. Its application has now extended to the prehospital environment, primarily for the verification of endotracheal tube (ETT) placement, endeavouring to reduce the occurrence of oesophageal intubations (Grmec and Malley, 2004). In recent times, technological advances, coupled with an increased appreciation of the importance of prehospital interventions, has resulted in the production of additional equipment capable of monitoring ETCO2 in non-intubated, self-ventilating patients via a non-invasive nasal cannula. Despite having an extensive range of potential uses, the apparatus is widely underused (Langhan and Chen, 2008). In this article, potential applications in the prehospital setting will be discussed via a review of contemporary literature.
    • Paramedic clinical leadership

      Martin, John; Swinburn, Andy (2012-03)
      Developing the paramedic profession is at the heart of the mission for the College of Paramedics. As any profession develops it evolves to take leadership and responsibility for a growing body of knowledge that informs practice. Back in 2008 the College published the second edition of the curriculum framework for paramedics clearly outlining the need for the development of roles at a variety of clinical levels. Having these levels populated creates a clinical framework that will deliver patient benefit and develop future paramedic practice. At its recent Council meeting the College outlined the need to develop education standards, clinical guidelines, and voluntary regulation for these emerging elements on the career framework, and is set to do this over the coming year. In this article Andy Swinburn the College Council representative for NW region outlines how the North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust has put into place a structured career development spanning the professional roles from first registration to consultant practice. https://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/full/10.12968/jpar.2012.4.3.181 ] This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/jpar.2012.4.3.181
    • Acquisition and interpretation of focused diagnostic ultrasound images by ultrasound-naive advanced paramedics: trialling a PHUS education programme

      Brooke, Mike; Walton, Julie; Scutt, Diane; Connolly, Jim; Jarman, Bob (2012-04)
      Objective This trial investigated whether advanced paramedics from a UK regional ambulance service have the ability to acquire and interpret diagnostic quality ultrasound images following a 2-day programme of education and training covering the fundamental aspects of lung ultrasound. Method The participants were tested using a two-part examination; assessing both their theoretical understanding of image interpretation and their practical ability to acquire diagnostic quality ultrasound images. The results obtained were subsequently compared with those obtained from expert physician sonographers. Results The advanced paramedics demonstrated an overall accuracy in identifying the presence or absence of pneumothorax in M-mode clips of 0.94 (CI 0.86 to 0.99), compared with the experts who achieved 0.93 (CI 0.67 to 1.0). In two-dimensional mode, the advanced paramedics demonstrated an overall accuracy of 0.78 (CI 0.72 to 0.83), compared with the experts who achieved 0.76 (CI 0.62 to 0.86). In total, the advanced paramedics demonstrated an overall accuracy at identifying the presence or absence of pneumothorax in prerecorded video clip images of 0.82 (CI 0.77 to 0.86), in comparison with the expert users of 0.80 (CI 0.68 to 0.88). All of the advanced paramedics passed the objective structured clinical examination and achieved a practical standard considered by the examiners to be equivalent to that which would be expected from candidates enrolled on the thoracic module of the College of Emergency Medicine level 2 ultrasound programme. Conclusion This trial demonstrated that ultrasoundnaive practitioners can achieve an acceptable standard of competency in a simulated environment in a relatively short period of time. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/29/4/322.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2010.106484