• The costs of falls in the community to the North East Ambulance Service

      Newton, Julia L.; Kyle, P.; Liversidge, P.; Robinson, G.; Wilton, K.; Reeve, P. (2006-05-19)
      This study set out to quantify the immediate costs to the North East Ambulance Service (NEAS) of attending to fallers. https://emj.bmj.com/content/23/6/479 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI 10.1136/emj.2005.028803
    • Defining major trauma: a literature review

      Thompson, Lee; Hill, Michael; Shaw, Gary (2019-06-01)
      Introduction: Major trauma in the elderly population has been increasingly reported over the past decade. Compared to younger populations, elderly patients may experience major trauma as a result of low mechanisms of injury (MOIs) and as a result, existing definitions for ‘major trauma’ should be challenged. This literature review provides an overview of previous conceptualisations of defining ‘major trauma’ and considers their utility in relation to the pre-hospital phase of care. Methods: A systematic search strategy was performed using CINAHL, Cochrane Library and Web of Science (MEDLINE). Grey literature and key documents from cited references were also examined. Results: A total of 121 articles were included in the final analysis. Predominantly, retrospective scoring systems, such as the Injury Severity Score (ISS), were used to define major trauma. Pre-hospital variables considered indicative of major trauma included: fatal outcomes, injury type/pattern, deranged physiology and perceived need for treatment sequelae such as intensive care unit (ICU) admission, surgical intervention or the administration of blood products. Within the pre-hospital environment, retrospective scoring systems as a means of identifying major trauma are of limited utility and should not detract from the broader clinical picture. Similarly, although MOI is often a useful consideration, it should be used in conjunction with other factors in identifying major trauma patients. Conclusions: In the pre-hospital environment, retrospective scoring systems are not available and other variables must be considered. Based upon this review, a working definition of major trauma is suggested as: ‘A traumatic event resulting in fatal injury or significant injury with accompanying deranged physiology, regardless of MOI, and/or is predicted to require significant treatment sequelae such as ICU admission, surgical intervention, or the administration of blood products’. Abstract published with permission.
    • A rapid response falls service – a new solution to a growing problem

      Charlton, Karl (2019-09-24)
      Background Falls are frequent in older people and are the primary cause of injury in adults aged 65+. Falls are associated with high mortality, morbidity and immobility. Many people who fall become frequent fallers, increasing the risk of serious injury; subsequently falls prevention is an NHS priority. A new rapid response falls service comprising of a Paramedic and Occupational Therapist was launched on 30th November 2018 but no evidence exists to determine the clinical or cost effectiveness of this intervention. This research aims to: Evaluate the rate of hospital admission for patients who pass through the intervention Evaluate the cost effectiveness of the intervention. Determine the prevalence of risk factors for falling in the study group & determine any differences between those admitted to hospital and those who are not Methods This study is an observational, prospective cohort study and aims to recruit all patients who pass through the intervention who meet the eligibility criteria. Calculations indicate a sample size of 677. With informed consent, we will collect anonymised data relating to each patient, their care episode and ambulance despatch data. These data will answer the aims of this study and provide detail on how various patient groups differ. Research ethics committee and HRA approval has been granted. Results Interim results will be presented in the form of graphs, frequencies, percentages and mean values to demonstrate the rate of hospital admission, cost effectiveness of the intervention and disease prevalence for the study group. A narrative will contextualise findings to date and generate discussion. We will provide the rate of consent, dissent and withdrawal for the cohort. Conclusions A summary of findings to date will be provided as well as implications for patients and the NHS. Limitations of this work will be discussed and opportunities for future research highlighted., https://emj.bmj.com/content/36/10/e5.3 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2019-999abs.10