• Characteristics of patients according to the mode of admission to regional stroke services

      Price, Christopher; Rae, V.; Duckett, Jay; Wood, R.; McMeekin, Peter; Gray, J.; Rodgers, Helen; Ford, Gary A. (2012-12)
    • A comparison of actual versus predicted emergency ambulance journey times using generic Geographic Information System software

      McMeekin, Peter; Gray, Joanne; Ford, Gary A; Duckett, Jay; Price, Christopher (2014-09)
      Study objective The planning of regional emergency medical services is aided by accurate prediction of urgent ambulance journey times, but it is unclear whether it is appropriate to use Geographical Information System (GIS) products designed for general traffic. We examined the accuracy of a commercially available generic GIS package when predicting emergency ambulance journey times under different population and temporal conditions. Methods We undertook a retrospective cohort study of emergency ambulance admissions to three emergency departments (ED) serving differing population distributions in northeast England (urban/suburban/rural). The transport time from scene to ED for all the highest priority dispatches between 1 October 2009 and 30 September 2010 was compared with predictions made by generic GIS software. Results For 10 156 emergency ambulance journeys, the mean prediction discrepancy between actual and predicted journey times across all EDs was an underprediction of 1.6 min (SD 4.9). Underprediction was statistically significant at all population densities, but unlikely to be of clinical significance. Ambulances in urban areas were able to exceed general traffic speed, whereas, the opposite effect was seen in suburban and rural road networks. There were minor effects due to travel outside the busiest traffic times (mean overprediction 0.8 min) and during winter months (mean underprediction 0.4 min). Conclusions It is reasonable to estimate emergency ambulance journey times using generic GIS software, but in order to avoid insufficient regional ambulance provision it would be necessary to make small adjustments because of the tendency towards systematic underprediction. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/31/9/758.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2012-202246
    • Incidence of peri-opiate nausea and vomiting in the pre-hospital setting: an intermediate analysis

      Campbell, Gareth; Woollard, Malcolm; McLure, Sally; Duckett, Jay; Newcombe, Robert; Clarke, Tom (2011-03)
      Background Intravenous morphine is the preferred drug for the treatment of moderate to severe pain by paramedics. Nausea and vomiting are believed to be frequent side-effects and routine co-administration of metoclopramide is common. In the absence of pre-hospital data to support this practice, we sought to determine the incidence of peri-opiate nausea and vomiting in an ambulance service which does not administer anti-emetics. Methods This prospective observational study is currently assessing the incidence of emesis in 400 patients attended by the North East Ambulance Service, aged above 17 years and receiving morphine, using a patient-scored Nausea and Vomiting Score (NVS: 0=no nausea or vomiting, 1=slight nausea, 2=moderate nausea, 3=severe nausea, 4=vomited once, 5=vomited twice or more). Results To date 145 patients have been recruited. Median NVS before morphine was 0 (range 0 to 6, inter-quartile range (IQR) 0 to 1): 54/141 (38%) of patients had some degree of nausea or vomiting. Median NVS on hospital arrival (after morphine) was 0 (range of 0 to 6, IQR 0 to 1): 54/130 (42%) patients had some degree of nausea or vomiting. The differences pre- vs. post-morphine in median NVS (p=0.98) and proportion of patients suffering nausea and vomiting are not statistically significant (p=0.98 and p=0.54 respectively). There were no significant correlations between pre-morphine pain score and pre-morphine NVS; post-morphine pain score and post-morphine NVS; pre-morphine NVS and total morphine dose; and post-morphine NVS and total morphine dose (Spearman's rank correlation 0.09, p=0.274; 0.07, p=0.44; 0.10, p=0.25; and 0.10, p=0.24 respectively). Conclusion and recommendations To date this study has found no evidence that pre-hospital administration of morphine is associated with an increased incidence or severity of nausea and vomiting and therefore does not appear to support the routine co-administration of metoclopramide. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/28/3/237.2.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2010.108597.2
    • The influence of paramedic assessment on emergency transportation of stroke patients

      Price, Christopher; Duckett, Jay; Cessford, C.; Ford, Gary A. (2008-09-01)
    • Introduction of the I-gel supraglottic airway device for prehospital airway management in a UK ambulance service

      Duckett, Jay; Fell, P.; Han, Kyee; Kimber, C.; Taylor, C. (2014-06)
      Aim To clinically review the use of basic and advanced airway management techniques within the North East Ambulance Service National Health Service Foundation Trust (NEAS) for cardiac arrests following the introduction of the i-gel. Method Two retrospective clinical audits were carried out over a monthly period (May 2011 and January 2012) using electronic and paper NEAS patient records. Results This audit confirmed that a range of basic and/or advanced airway management techniques are being successfully used to manage the airways of cardiac arrest patients. I-gel is emerging as a popular choice for maintaining and securing the airway during prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Success rates for i-gel insertion are higher (94%, 92%) than endotracheal (ET) tube insertion (90%, 86%). Documentation of the airway management method was poor in 11% of the records. The Quality Improvement Officers addressed this by providing individual feedback. Conclusions I-gel shows a higher success rate in cardiac arrest patients compared to the ET tube. Staff who chose to use methods other than i-gel indicated this was a confidence issue when using new equipment. The re-audit indicated an upward trend in the popularity of i-gel; insertion is faster with a higher success rate, which allows the crew to progress with the other resuscitation measures more promptly. Airway soiling and aspiration beforehand have been reasons staff resort to ET intubation. It is anticipated by the authors that i-gel will emerge as the first choice of airway management device in prehospital cardiac arrests. https://emj.bmj.com/content/emermed/31/6/505.full.pdf This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2012-202126
    • Modeling outcomes following redirection of emergency stroke admissions from ten local stroke units to two neuroscience centres

      McMeekin, Peter; Gray, J.; Price, Christopher; Rae, Victoria; Duckett, Jay; Wood, R.; Rodgers, H.; Ford, A. (2012-12-06)
    • An observational study of patient characteristics associated with the mode of admission to acute stroke services in North East, England

      Price, Christopher; Rae, Victoria; Duckett, Jay; Wood, Ruth; Gray, Joanne; McMeekin, Peter; Rodgers, Helen; Portas, Karen; Ford, Gary A. (2013-10)
    • A Retrospective Analysis of the Nature, Extent and Cost of Alcohol-Related Emergency Calls to the Ambulance Service in an English Region

      Martin, N; Newbury-Birch, Dorothy; Duckett, Jay; Mason, H; Shen, J; Shevills, C; Kaner, E (2012-01-18)