• Ecstasy toxicity and the cooling factor

      Archer, Tom (2008-07-25)
      A rapid response unit (RRU) and ambulance were dispatched to a young adult reported to be fitting at the site of a “rave”. On arrival, the patient was being treated by a medical team who were providing cover at the event and the RRU paramedic. The patient was reported to have taken eight ecstasy tablets and had been fitting for approximately 10 min, but this had been terminated with 10 mg diazepam (Diazemuls) given intravenously. He had also been given 800 μg naloxone and 50 ml 0.9% normal saline had also been administered. https://emj.bmj.com/content/25/8/534 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2007.054783
    • Ipratropium bromide: a bit of a wheeze?

      Archer, Tom (2007-06)
      Administration of ipratropium bromide has become standard care in UK prehospital practice for acute severe or life-threatening asthma. This retrospective ‘‘before and after’’ USA study examined prehospital and emergency department records 6 months before and after the introduction of prehospital ipratropium. https://emj.bmj.com/content/24/6/439 ] This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2007.048835