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dc.contributor.authorMainds, Matthew D.
dc.contributor.authorJones, Colin
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-14T15:42:09Z
dc.date.available2019-08-14T15:42:09Z
dc.date.issued2018-07
dc.identifier.citationMainds, M.D. and Jones, C., 2018. Breaking bad news and managing family during an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Journal of Paramedic Practice, 10 (7), 292-299.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1759-1376
dc.identifier.issn2041-9457
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/jpar.2018.10.7.292
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/170
dc.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. The management of family during out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and death notification to the family of the deceased in the out-of-hospital setting are topics that are poorly evidenced. Two focus groups consisting of six participants in each were conducted, discussing the two subjects. The results suggest that paramedics prefer family not to be present in the room for a number of reasons and that they don’t feel sufficiently trained by their paramedic courses in order to manage family during resuscitation or breaking bad news. The study highlighted a need for more research on both subjects.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectResuscitationen_US
dc.subjectPatient and Public Involvement (PPI)en_US
dc.subjectGriefen_US
dc.subjectOut-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA)en_US
dc.titleBreaking bad news and managing family during an out-of-hospital cardiac arresten_US
dc.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Paramedic Practiceen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-07-18
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.12968/jpar.2018.10.7.292en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-07-18
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2018-07
html.description.abstractAbstract published with permission. The management of family during out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and death notification to the family of the deceased in the out-of-hospital setting are topics that are poorly evidenced. Two focus groups consisting of six participants in each were conducted, discussing the two subjects. The results suggest that paramedics prefer family not to be present in the room for a number of reasons and that they don’t feel sufficiently trained by their paramedic courses in order to manage family during resuscitation or breaking bad news. The study highlighted a need for more research on both subjects.en_US


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