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dc.contributor.authorEaton, Georgette
dc.date.accessioned2022-12-09T17:24:26Z
dc.date.available2022-12-09T17:24:26Z
dc.date.issued2022-11
dc.identifier.citationEaton, G., 2022. Advancing practice through the lens of patient care. Journal of Paramedic Practice, 14 (11), 446-448.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1759-1376
dc.identifier.issn2041-9457
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/jpar.2022.14.11.446
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/1340
dc.description.abstractJust over a decade ago, when I first registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) (then the Health Professions Council), I did not picture a career outside of the back of an ambulance—unless I ceased to be a paramedic entirely. Yet, over the last 10 years, one of the main components that has catalysed the development of the profession is the idea that paramedics could capitalise their generalist unique selling point (USP) to work to an enhanced clinical level. The development of the paramedic profession itself is not new—we have continuously developed since our inception from working clinically within the constraints of providing life support under the supervision of cardiologists, to being autonomous clinicians in our own right. However, the progression to working within advanced practice has been something new—and I think we have the changing model of care delivery within the ambulance service to thank for this. Abstract published with permission.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectTraining and Educationen_US
dc.subjectParamedic Practiceen_US
dc.subjectParamedicineen_US
dc.subjectProfessional Developmenten_US
dc.subjectClinical Competenceen_US
dc.subjectPatient Careen_US
dc.titleAdvancing practice through the lens of patient careen_US
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Paramedic Practiceen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-11-28
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2022-11-28
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2022-11-02
html.description.abstractJust over a decade ago, when I first registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) (then the Health Professions Council), I did not picture a career outside of the back of an ambulance—unless I ceased to be a paramedic entirely. Yet, over the last 10 years, one of the main components that has catalysed the development of the profession is the idea that paramedics could capitalise their generalist unique selling point (USP) to work to an enhanced clinical level. The development of the paramedic profession itself is not new—we have continuously developed since our inception from working clinically within the constraints of providing life support under the supervision of cardiologists, to being autonomous clinicians in our own right. However, the progression to working within advanced practice has been something new—and I think we have the changing model of care delivery within the ambulance service to thank for this. Abstract published with permission.en_US


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