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dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Jack
dc.contributor.authorEaton-Williams, Peter
dc.contributor.authorMortimer, Craig
dc.contributor.authorLand, Victoria
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Julia
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-12T15:41:58Z
dc.date.available2022-03-12T15:41:58Z
dc.date.issued2021-06-01
dc.identifier.citationBarrett, J.W. et al, 2021. A survey of ambulance clinicians’ perceptions of recording and communicating patient information electronically. British Paramedic Journal, 6 (1), 1-7.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1478-4726
dc.identifier.doi10.29045/14784726.2021.6.6.1.1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12417/1300
dc.description.abstractObjective: Ambulance services are evolving from use of paper-based recording of patient information to electronic platforms and the impact of this change has yet to be fully explored. The aim of this study is to explore how the introduction of a system permitting electronic information capture and its subsequent sharing were perceived by the ambulance clinicians using it. Methods: An online questionnaire was designed based upon the technology acceptance model and distributed throughout one ambulance service in the south east of England. Closed-ended questions with Likert scales were used to collect data from patient-facing staff who use an online community falls and diabetic referral platform or an electronic messaging system to update GPs following a patient encounter. Results: There were 273 responses from ambulance clinicians. Most participants agreed that they used tablet computers and smartphones to make their life easier (85% and 86%, respectively). Most participants felt that referring patients to a community falls or diabetic team electronically was an efficient use of their time (81% and 81%, respectively) and many believed that these systems improved the communication of confidential patient information. GP summaries were perceived as increasing time spent on scene but most participants (89%) believed they enabled collaborative working. Overall, collecting and sharing patient information electronically was perceived by most participants as beneficial to their practice. Conclusion: In this study, the ability to electronically refer patients to community services and share patient encounters with the GP was predominantly perceived as both safe for patients and an effective use of the participants’ clinical time. However, there is often still a need to communicate to GPs in real time, demonstrating that technology could complement, rather than replace, how clinicians communicate. Abstract published with permission.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.subjectElectronic Patient Recordsen_US
dc.subjectTechnologyen_US
dc.subjectParamedicsen_US
dc.subjectAmbulanceen_US
dc.titleA survey of ambulance clinicians’ perceptions of recording and communicating patient information electronicallyen_US
dc.source.journaltitleBritish Paramedic Journalen_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-06-15
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2021-06-01
html.description.abstractObjective: Ambulance services are evolving from use of paper-based recording of patient information to electronic platforms and the impact of this change has yet to be fully explored. The aim of this study is to explore how the introduction of a system permitting electronic information capture and its subsequent sharing were perceived by the ambulance clinicians using it. Methods: An online questionnaire was designed based upon the technology acceptance model and distributed throughout one ambulance service in the south east of England. Closed-ended questions with Likert scales were used to collect data from patient-facing staff who use an online community falls and diabetic referral platform or an electronic messaging system to update GPs following a patient encounter. Results: There were 273 responses from ambulance clinicians. Most participants agreed that they used tablet computers and smartphones to make their life easier (85% and 86%, respectively). Most participants felt that referring patients to a community falls or diabetic team electronically was an efficient use of their time (81% and 81%, respectively) and many believed that these systems improved the communication of confidential patient information. GP summaries were perceived as increasing time spent on scene but most participants (89%) believed they enabled collaborative working. Overall, collecting and sharing patient information electronically was perceived by most participants as beneficial to their practice. Conclusion: In this study, the ability to electronically refer patients to community services and share patient encounters with the GP was predominantly perceived as both safe for patients and an effective use of the participants’ clinical time. However, there is often still a need to communicate to GPs in real time, demonstrating that technology could complement, rather than replace, how clinicians communicate. Abstract published with permission.en_US


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