• Access to specialist care: Optimizing the geographic configuration of trauma systems

      Jansen, Jan; Morrison, Jonathan; Wang, Handing; He, Shan; Lawrenson, Robin; Hutchison, James; Campbell, Marion (2015-11)
    • Capability of Scottish emergency departments to provide physician-based prehospital critical care teams: a national survey

      Newton, Alastair; Adams, Jennifer; Simpson, Katherine; Egan, Gerry; Gowens, Paul; Donald, Michael (2013-12)
    • Clinician tasking in ambulance control improves the identification of major trauma patients and pre-hospital critical care team tasking

      Sinclair, Neil; Swinton, Paul; Donald, Michael; Curatolo, Lisa; Lindle, Peter; Jones, Steph; Corfield, Alasdair (2018-05)
    • The discrimination of quick Paediatric Early Warning Scores in the pre-hospital setting

      Corfield, Alasdair; Clerihew, Linda; Stewart, Elaine; Staines, H.; Tough, Dahrlene; Rooney, Kieron D. (2020-03)
    • Effect of pre-hospital administration of unfractionated heparin in acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction

      McGinley, Christopher; Mordi, Ify R.; Kelly, Paul; Currie, Peter; Hutcheon, Stuart; Koch, Stephan; Martin, Thomas; Irving, John (2018-01-25)
      We studied the effects of pre-hospital heparin in primary PCI patients, on infarct artery patency and long-term mortality. https://heart.bmj.com/content/104/Suppl_1/A6.2 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/heartjnl-2018-BCIS.11
    • Estimating the Burden of Alcohol on Ambulance Callouts through Development and Validation of an Algorithm Using Electronic Patient Records

      Manca, Francesco; Lewsey, Jim; Waterson, Ryan; Kernaghan, Sarah; Fitzpatrick, David; Mackay, Daniel; Angus, Colin; Fitzgerald, Niamh (2021-06-11)
    • Exploring the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour of the general public to responding to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

      Dobbie, Fiona; Clegg, Gareth; MacKintosh, Anne Marie; Bauld, Linda (2019-01-14)
      Bystander Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) is a key determinant of survival after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) but is performed at only around half of OHCA in UK. This study collected data to inform a social marketing strategy to address the barriers to responding to OHCA. https://emj.bmj.com/content/36/1/e8.2 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2019-999.20
    • Factors influencing hospital conveyance following ambulance attendance for people with diabetes: A retrospective observational study

      van Woerden, Hugo; Bucholc, Magda; Clubbs Coldron, Benjamin; Coates, Vivien; Heaton, Janet; McCann, Michael; Perrin, Nikki; Waterson, Ryan; Watson, A.; MacRury, Sandra (2020-08-15)
    • The feasibility and acceptability of a novel low tech intervention to improve pre-hospital data recording for pre-alert and handover to the emergency department

      Fitzpatrick, David; Maxwell, Douglas; Craigie, Alan (2019-01-14)
      Poor communication during patient handover is recognised internationally as a root cause of a significant proportion of preventable deaths. Data used in handover is not always easily recorded using ambulance based tablets, particularly in time-critical cases. Paramedics have therefore developed pragmatic workarounds (writing on gloves or scrap paper) to record these data. However, such practices can conflict with policy, data recorded can be variable, easily lost and negatively impact on handover quality. https://emj.bmj.com/content/36/1/e6.1 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2019-999.14
    • Feasibility and utility of population-level geospatial injury profiling: prospective, national cohort study

      Jansen, Jan; Morrison, Jonathan; Wang, Handing; He, Shan; Lawrenson, Robin; Campbell, Marion; Green, David (2015-05)
    • Forecasting the demand profile for a physician-led pre-hospital care service using a mathematical model

      Moultrie, Chris; Corfield, Alasdair; Pell, J.; Mackay, Daniel (2017-05-21)
      We aimed to investigate if a queueing-theory derived, stochastic, computerised mathematical model could accurately predict the number and seasonal pattern of primary pre-hospital missions undertaken by a physician-led pre-hospital and retrieval service in 2016. https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/Suppl_3/A18.2.info This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-EMSabstracts.46
    • Frontiers of performance: using a mathematical model to discover unobservable performance limits in a pre-hospital and retrieval service

      Moultrie, Chris; Corfield, Alasdair; Pell, J.; Mackay, Daniel (2017-05-21)
      We aimed to establish if a validated computer model could derive otherwise unobservable performance limits for a physician-led pre-hospital and retrieval service. https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/Suppl_3/A18.1 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-EMSabstracts.45
    • Identifying patients at risk of futile resuscitation: palliative care indicators in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

      Cokljat, Mia; Lloyd, Adam; Clarke, Scott; Crawford, Anna; Clegg, Gareth (2019-09-17)
      Objectives Patients with indicators for palliative care, such as those with advanced life-limiting conditions, are at risk of futile cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if they suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Patients at risk of futile CPR could benefit from anticipatory care planning (ACP); however, the proportion of OHCA patients with indicators for palliative care is unknown. This study quantifies the extent of palliative care indicators and risk of CPR futility in OHCA patients. Methods A retrospective medical record review was performed on all OHCA patients presenting to an emergency department (ED) in Edinburgh, Scotland in 2015. The risk of CPR futility was stratified using the Supportive and Palliative Care Indicators Tool. Patients with 0–2 indicators had a ‘low risk’ of futile CPR; 3–4 indicators had an ‘intermediate risk’; 5+ indicators had a ‘high risk’. Results Of the 283 OHCA patients, 12.4% (35) had a high risk of futile CPR, while 16.3% (46) had an intermediate risk and 71.4% (202) had a low risk. 84.0% (68) of intermediate-to-high risk patients were pronounced dead in the ED or ED step-down ward; only 2.5% (2) of these patients survived to discharge. Conclusions Up to 30% of OHCA patients are being subjected to advanced resuscitation despite having at least three indicators for palliative care. More than 80% of patients with an intermediate-to-high risk of CPR futility are dying soon after conveyance to hospital, suggesting that ACP can benefit some OHCA patients. This study recommends optimising emergency treatment planning to help reduce inappropriate CPR attempts. https://spcare.bmj.com/content/early/2019/09/17/bmjspcare-2019-001828. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-001828
    • Impact of drug and equipment preparation on pre-hospital emergency Anaesthesia (PHEA) procedural time, error rate and cognitive load

      Swinton, Paul; Corfield, Alasdair; Moultrie, Chris; Percival, David; Proctor, Jeffrey; Sinclair, Neil; Perkins, Zane (2018-09-21)
    • Improving post-hypoglycaemic patient safety in the prehospital environment: a systematic review

      Fitzpatrick, David; Duncan, Edward (2009-06-22)
      To determine the extent to which post-hypoglycaemic patients with diabetes, who are prescribed oral hypoglycaemic agents (OHA) are at risk of repeat hypoglycaemic events (RHE) after being treated in the prehospital environment and whether they should be transported to hospital regardless of their post-treatment response, a systematic literature review was carried out using an overlapping retrieval strategy that included both published and unpublished literature. Retrieved papers were reviewed by each author for inclusion. Disagreements regarding inclusion were resolved through discussion. Ninety-eight papers and other relevant material were retrieved using the developed search strategy. Twenty-three papers and other relevant material were included in the final review. A narrative synthesis of the findings is presented. Although several case reports demonstrate the risks associated with repeat or prolonged hypoglycaemia, the review was unable to locate any specific high quality research in this area. Consequently, caution is required in interpreting the findings of the studies. Post-hypoglycaemic patients treated in the prehospital environment have a 2–7% risk of experiencing a RHE within 48 h. The literature retrieved in this study recognises the potential for OHA to cause RHE. However, the extent to which this occurs in practice remains unknown. This lack of evidence has led to the recommendation that conservative management, through admission to hospital, is appropriate. The review concludes with recommendations for both practice and research. https://emj.bmj.com/content/26/7/472. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2008.062240
    • Infection control implications of the laundering of ambulance staff uniforms and reusable mops

      Mackay, W. G.; Whitehead, S.; Purdue, N.; Smith, M.; Redhead, N.; Williams, C.; Wilson, S. (2017-05)
    • Initial prehospital vital signs to predict subsequent adverse hospital outcomes

      Williams, T.A.; Ho, K.M.; Tohira, H.; Fatovich, D.M.; Bailey, P.; Brink, D.; Gowens, Paul; Perkins, Gavin; Finn, Judith (2017-05-21)
      There is growing interest to improve identification of the critically ill patient in the prehospital setting.1–3 We aimed to assess whether initial vital physiological signs in the prehospital setting can predict subsequent adverse hospital outcomes, defined as intensive care (ICU) admission or death in the emergency department (ED). https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/Suppl_3/A5.3 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-EMSabstracts.14