Now showing items 1-20 of 101

    • The influence of paramedic assessment on emergency transportation of stroke patients

      Price, C.I.; Duckett, Jay; Cessford, C.; Ford, Gary A. (2008-09-01)
    • A systematic review of the clinical and demographic characteristics of adult patients with stroke mimics

      McClelland, Graham; Flynn, Darren; Rodgers, Helen; Price, Christopher (2015-09-01)
    • Paramedic experiences of using an enhanced stroke assessment during a cluster randomised trial: a qualitative thematic analysis

      Lally, Joanne; Vaittinen, Anu; McClelland, Graham; Price, Christopher I.; Shaw, Lisa; Ford, Gary A.; Flynn, Darren; Exley, Catherine (2020-06-16)
      Background Intravenous thrombolysis is a key element of emergency treatment for acute ischaemic stroke, but hospital service delivery is variable. The Paramedic Acute Stroke Treatment Assessment (PASTA) multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial evaluated whether an enhanced paramedic-initiated stroke assessment pathway could improve thrombolysis volume. This paper reports the findings of a parallel process evaluation which explored intervention paramedics’ experience of delivering the enhanced assessment. Methods Interviewees were recruited from 453 trained intervention paramedics across three UK ambulance services hosting the trial: North East, North West and Welsh Ambulance Services. A semistructured interview guide aimed to (1) explore the stroke-specific assessment and handover procedures which were part of the PASTA pathway and (2) enable paramedics to share relevant views about expanding their role and any barriers/enablers they encountered. Interviews were audiorecorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed following the principles of the constant comparative method. Results Twenty-six interviews were conducted (11 North East, 10 North West and 5 Wales). Iterative data analysis identified four key themes, which reflected paramedics’ experiences at different stages of the care pathway: (1) Enhanced assessment at scene: paramedics felt this improved their skillset and confidence. (2) Prealert to hospital: a mixed experience dependent on receiving hospital staff. (3) Handover to hospital team: standardisation of format was viewed as the primary benefit of the PASTA pathway. (4) Assisting in hospital and feedback: due to professional boundaries, paramedics found these aspects harder to achieve, although feedback from the clinical team was valued when available. Conclusion Paramedics believed that the PASTA pathway enhanced their skills and the emergency care of stroke patients, but a continuing clinical role postadmission was challenging. Future studies should consider whether interdisciplinary training is needed to enable more radical extension of professional boundaries for paramedics. https://emj.bmj.com/content/early/2020/06/16/emermed-2019-209392. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2019-209392
    • Feasibility of phenytoin as a paramedic-led second-line anti-epileptic drug

      Morrison, Luke (2020-09-07)
      Background: Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) is a medical emergency that is commonly encountered in the prehospital setting. In almost all prehospital settings, treatment is limited to benzodiazepines even though the standard of care in emergency departments includes second-line agents such as phenytoin. Methods: A literature search was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar using the search terms ‘phenytoin’, ‘seizure’ or ‘convulsive’ and ‘prehospital’, ‘EMS’ or ‘ambulance’ or ‘emergency department’. Five articles were analysed and a narrative review formed. Results: Phenytoin is an effective and commonly used second-line anti-epileptic agent but there is a distinct lack of evidence on prehospital phenytoin. Phasing the introduction of phenytoin into practice while simultaneously running a well-designed research trial could provide data for prehospital providers and the wider health community. Conclusion: Management of CSE will continue to present challenges to prehospital providers. Promoting the introduction of phenytoin to select patients, administered by advanced clinicians, could be an excellent opportunity to generate much-needed clinical data and potentially reduce morbidity and mortality in CSE. Abstract published with permission.
    • Development and impact of a dedicated cardiac arrest response unit in a UK regional ambulance service

      Younger, Paul; McClelland, Graham; Fell, Paul (2015-05-19)
      Background Survival rates from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) vary, with figures from 2% to 12% reported nationally. Our ambulance service introduced a dedicated cardiac arrest response unit (CARU) as a trial in order to improve local patient outcomes by focussing training, extending the scope of practice and increasing exposure to cardiac arrests. CARU launched in January 2014 using a rapid response car staffed by senior paramedics responding to cardiac arrests within a 19 minute radius of their location⇓. VIEW INLINE VIEW POPUP Methods This work describes the development and impact of CARU during the initial six months (10/01/14 to 09/07/2014) of operations using prospectively collected data on all cases attended. Results CARU activated to 165 calls and attended 65% (n=107). 50% (n=54) of the cases attended were cardiac arrests where resuscitation was attempted. Return of Spontaneous Circulation (ROSC) was achieved during pre-hospital resuscitation in 52% (n=28) of cases. Patient outcomes are reported compared with service data for January to June 2014 inclusive and one year of historical data from the regional OHCA registry: Conclusions Based on these figures CARU appears to have a positive impact on ROSC and a significant impact on survival to discharge rates compared with the rest of the service (p<0.01, Fisher's exact test). Further work is needed to explore how CARU delivers this impact and how the CARU model can be implemented beyond the trial setting in a sustainable fashion. https://emj.bmj.com/content/32/6/503.2. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2015-204979.2
    • A two armed, randomised, controlled exploratory study of adding the ambugard cleaning system to normal deep cleaning procedures in a regional ambulance service

      McClelland, Graham; Charlton, Karl; Mains, Jacqueline; Millican, Karen; Cullerton, Caroline (2020-10)
      Ambulance services transport patients with infections and diseases and could pose a cross transmission risk to patients and staff through environmental contamination. The literature suggests that environmental pathogens are present on ambulances, cleaning is inconsistent and patient/staff impact is difficult to quantify. Eco-Mist developed a dry misting decontamination system for ambulance use called AmbuGard which works in <30 minutes and is 99.9999% effective against common pathogens. The research question is ‘What pathogens are present on North East Ambulance Service ambulances and what impact does adding the AmbuGard to the deep cleaning process make?’ https://emj.bmj.com/content/37/10/e4.1 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2020-999abs.5
    • Modeling outcomes following redirection of emergency stroke admissions from ten local stroke units to two neuroscience centres

      McMeekin, Peter; Gray, J.; Price, C.; Rae, Victoria; Duckett, Jay; Wood, R.; Rodgers, H.; Ford, A. (2012-12-06)
    • Effect of an Enhanced Paramedic Acute Stroke Treatment Assessment on Thrombolysis Delivery During Emergency Stroke Care: A Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial

      Price, Christopher I.; Shaw, L.; Islam, Saiful; Javanbakht, Mehdi; Watkins, Alan; McKeekin, Peter; Snooks, Helen; Flynn, Darren; Francis, Richard; Lakey, Rachel; et al. (2020-04-13)
    • Effect of an Enhanced Paramedic Acute Stroke Treatment Assessment on Thrombolysis Delivery During Emergency Stroke Care: A Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial

      Price, Christopher I.; Shaw, Lisa; Islam, Saiful; Javanbakht, Mehdi; Watkins, Alan; McMeakin, Peter; Snooks, Helen; Flynn, Darren; Francis, Richard; Lakey, Rachel; et al. (2020-07)
    • Impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on hangings attended by emergency medical services

      McClelland, Graham; Shaw, Gary; Thompson, Lee; Wilson, Nina; Grayling, Michael (2020-10-24)
    • Ambulance documentation of stroke symptoms during the UK COVID-19 ‘Stay at Home’ message

      McClelland, Graham; Wilson, Nina; Shaw, Lisa; Grayling, Michael; Haworth, Daniel; Price, Christopher (2020-11-16)
      On 23 March 2020 the UK government urged the public to ‘Stay Home, Protect the NHS, Save Lives’ in order to reduce consequences from the COVID-19 pandemic.1 Three large National Health Service (NHS) stroke units subsequently reported a 16% (95% CI 27.2 to 3.2) decrease in the weekly trend for stroke admissions during March–April compared with January–February 2020. https://emj.bmj.com/content/early/2020/11/16/emermed-2020-210319 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2020-210319
    • Is weight just a number? The accuracy of UK ambulance paediatric weight guidance – findings from a cross sectional study

      Charlton, Karl; Capsey, Matt; Moat, Christopher (2020-09-25)
      Background The weight of children is the cornerstone of their clinical management. It determines fluid quantities, drug dosages and defibrillation power, which are administered on a per kilogram basis. Gold standard care for all paediatric patients who attend hospital involves being weighed using scales. This is not possible in the out of hospital setting, where weight derives from a guidance table based upon age. No evidence exists to indicate if the page by age approach indicated in current ambulance guidelines meets the reference standard of 70% of estimations within 10% of actual weight and 95% within 20% of actual weight. Methods We used a cross sectional study design and collected data from a convenience sample of children who attended the outpatient’s department of a major hospital in England between July and September 2019. All children aged between one and eleven years who were weighed were eligible for inclusion. Outcomes were to determine if the page by age approach meets the reference standard and to determine any implications for care. Results Three hundred and forty-one children were included in this study. Each age group consisted of varying numbers of children. 50.5% (172/341) of the sample were female. Observed weights ranged from 8.28 to 82.70 kg (median 20.60 kg). The mean weight of girls versus boys was 24.69 kg and 23.39 kg respectively (95% CI -4.12–1.32, p=0.3123). Observed weights were greater than the page for age guidance in all age groups and the accuracy of this approach diminishes with age. Conclusion Page by age weight guidance does not meet the reference standard. Most paediatric prehospital care is administered by age and not weight. In the absence of an accurate weight, ambulance clinicians should continue to use the page for age system, although the gold standard remains to use an accurate weight measurement. https://emj.bmj.com/content/37/10/e9.1. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2020-999abs.17
    • The costs of falls in the community to the North East Ambulance Service

      Newton, Julia L.; Kyle, P.; Liversidge, P.; Robinson, G.; Wilton, K.; Reeve, P. (2006-05-19)
      This study set out to quantify the immediate costs to the North East Ambulance Service (NEAS) of attending to fallers. https://emj.bmj.com/content/23/6/479 This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ DOI 10.1136/emj.2005.028803
    • Improving systems for research management and governance

      McLure, Sally; Dorgan, Sharon; Smith, Justine (2010-02)
      The North East Ambulance Service NHS Trust (NEAS) is committed to the implementation of a number of nationally proposed initiatives following the introduction of the research strategy Best Research for Best Health (Department of Health, 2006). The ambitious strategy introduces several measures to improve the research environment and ensure that studies commence more efficiently. This article provides an overview of the national initiatives, i.e. the Research Passport Scheme and the National Institute for Health Research Coordinated System for gaining NHS Permissions. These initiatives aim to strengthen and streamline research management and governance across England, which NEAS are actively embracing. Abstract published with permission.
    • A scoping review of pre-hospital technology to assist ambulance personnel with patient diagnosis or stratification during the emergency assessment of suspected stroke

      Lumley, H.A.; Flynn, Darren; Shaw, L.; McClelland, Graham; Ford, Gary A.; White, P.M.; Price, Christopher I. (2020-04-26)
    • Call to hospital times for suspected stroke patients in the North East of England: a service evaluation

      Haworth, Daniel; McClelland, Graham (2019-09-01)
      Introduction: Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity. The role of the ambulance service in acute stroke care focuses on recognition followed by rapid transport to specialist care. The treatment options for acute ischaemic strokes are time dependent, so minimising the prehospital phase of care is important. The aim of this service evaluation was to report historical pre-hospital times for suspected stroke patients transported by the North East Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust (NEAS) and identify areas for improvement. Methods: This was a retrospective service evaluation using routinely collected data. Data on overall call to hospital times, call to arrival times, on scene times and leave scene to hospital are reported. Results: Data on 24,070 patients with an impression of stroke transported by NEAS between 1 April 2011 and 31 May 2018 are reported. The median call to hospital time increased from 41 to 68 minutes, call to arrival from 7 to 17 minutes, on scene from 20 to 30 minutes and leave to hospital from 12 to 15 minutes. Conclusion: The pre-hospital call to hospital time for stroke patients increased between 2011 and 2018. The call to arrival phase saw a sharp increase between 2015 and 2017, whereas on scene and leave scene to hospital saw steadier increases. Increasing demand on the ambulance service, reorganisation of regional stroke services and other factors may have contributed to the increase in times. Reducing the on scene phase of pre-hospital stroke care would lead to patient benefits and is the area where ambulance clinicians have the most influence. Abstract published with permission.
    • Paramedic experiences of using an enhanced stroke assessment during a cluster randomised trial: a qualitative thematic analysis

      Lally, Joanne; Vaittinen, Anu; McClelland, Graham; Price, Christopher I.; Shaw, Lisa; Ford, Gary A.; Flynn, Darren; Exley, Catherine (2020-06-16)
      Intravenous thrombolysis is a key element of emergency treatment for acute ischaemic stroke, but hospital service delivery is variable. The Paramedic Acute Stroke Treatment Assessment (PASTA) multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial evaluated whether an enhanced paramedic-initiated stroke assessment pathway could improve thrombolysis volume. This paper reports the findings of a parallel process evaluation which explored intervention paramedics' experience of delivering the enhanced assessment. https://emj.bmj.com/content/37/8/480. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/